HomeQ&A¿Como se dice "I am insterested in ..." or "she is not interested on you" en español?

¿Como se dice "I am insterested in ..." or "she is not interested on you" en español?

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When I was trying to say "she is not interested on you" to my co-worker, I wasn's sure what I need to use to express it. That what I wrote is "no es interesada por ti" and don't think that this exists.
Por favor alguien puede díme algunas frases comúnas sobre como se usa "interested" en español.

Muchas gracias de antemano,

Marco

10671 views
updated AGO 18, 2008
posted by Marco-T

17 Answers

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Marco said:

I am sorry, Heidita if I made you confused. What I was trying to ask is why we use "interesa" or "gusta" (this third person present tense) here. If these are reflexive verbs, we should write "yo me intereso el cine" or "yo me gusto el cine". This really makes me confused. That´s why I was asking lazarus what kind of verbs these are.

Hopefully this makes sense for you,

Marco

Because the Spanish is equivalent to the more literal English. "The cinema interests me." and "The cinema pleases me." i.e. something provokes pleasure/liking in me. Hence, the "something" is the subject of the verb.

BTW It's the same in French, Italian and Japanese (if that helps).

updated AGO 18, 2008
posted by samdie
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I am sorry, Heidita if I made you confused.
What I was trying to ask is why we use "interesa" or "gusta" (this third person present tense) here. If these are reflexive verbs, we should write "yo me intereso el cine" or "yo me gusto el cine". This really makes me confused. That´s why I was asking lazarus what kind of verbs these are.
Hopefully this makes sense for you,

Marco

updated AGO 10, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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HI Marco: Interesar and gustar are different verbs.

Interesar: to be interested in
gustar: to like

Me interesa el cine.
Me gusta el cine.

updated AGO 10, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Oh, I didn¡t know that!

updated AGO 10, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Hi lazarus, can you tell me what kind of verb "interesar", "gustar" are? If I know what they are, I can learn the lessons from Reference link.
"me interesa ...", why do we use "interesa" this conjugated form for "gustar" here? Is this the third person present tense form? I didn´t get the reason for this kind of form.

Please tell me something about it.

Thank you,

Marco

updated AGO 10, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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Both are correct, you can write it in both forms.
[url=http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta'TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=futbol]http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta'TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=futbol[/url]
Anyway I prefer to write the accent mark and to pronunciate it that way FÿT-bol.

updated AGO 9, 2008
posted by Barrilito
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ELLA NO ESTA INTERESADA EN TI thats is SHES NOT INTERESTED ON YOU

updated AGO 9, 2008
posted by JORGE-EDUARDO-SANDOVAL
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A ella le caes bien. = She likes you

It is not exactly the same, but you can say it (with an "a" in "a ella").

updated AGO 9, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Tambien, Puede decir: Ella no le caes bien. no?
She doesn't like you.

updated AGO 9, 2008
posted by Sam
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Both? Well... one should read like futBOL, and the other like FÿTbol... unless you use quotes, or italics to indicate that it is a foreign word, and doesn't follow the Spanish spelling logic.

updated AGO 9, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Both are correct: futbol and fútbol

updated AGO 9, 2008
posted by Barrilito
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De nada Marco, es siempre un placer.

updated JUL 25, 2008
posted by Barrilito
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Muchas gracias por tu respuesta, Barrilito. It made sense for me and is really helpful too.

Marco

updated JUL 25, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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Thanks, Eddy for your reply and yes, "in" should be used here.

Marco

updated JUL 25, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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Hi Marco
"she is not interested on you"

Nobody has pointed out that the English should read

"she is not interested on in you"

updated JUL 25, 2008
posted by Eddy
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