HomeQ&AEstulticia

Estulticia

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Okay, alright, fine. Some dictionaries insist that the translation for "estulticia" is "folly/foolishness", but I would like to strongly, strenously and red-in-the-face object.

Look, guys, "estulticia" is a rather obscure and lofty synonym for "estupidez/necedad", so I would think that it's translation ought to be also a big, esoteric word.

But, so far, the only word I know that could give it the same sense of high-brow verbose haughtyness is a FRENCH word, for crap-sake. C'mon!! That's not even funny!!

Anyway. Look, I think "estulticia" being a noun and not a adjective, could be very well represented in meaning and register (the level of vocabulary) by:

bêtise

What do you all think about that?

Let me know, alright'

2591 views
updated JUL 7, 2008
posted by wtf

7 Answers

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Thanks for the option, Mr James. In truth, I believe it may boil down to regionalisms, also. I mean to say, as a Mexican I can tell you that I had never used the word "estulticia" until I started participating in semi-(pseudo')literary Spanish forums. It was often used in reference to my writings.
I suppose, like many other words, this particular one, although not very common, is used a bit more on one side of the Atlantic than the other.

For example: in Mexico we say that someone did something "on purpose" with the phrase "a propósito," while in Spain is more common to say, "a posta." As a Mexican, I spent many minutes scratching my head trying to figure out what "a posta" could possibly mean, but I got it by context.

Perhaps the same happens with "folly." Maybe our brit cousins have no problem using that word, while here in the States we say "bullshit," neh?

:D

What Da

updated JUL 7, 2008
posted by wtf
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Hi wtf
What I like about this site is that each day I learn something new. "Rebuscada", I like this word.

updated JUL 7, 2008
posted by Eddy
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I think the register of "folly" is about right. I mean, the average Joe on the street rarely, if ever, uses the word folly in his speech. And while it is not often used in speech, it is understood by native speakers, and I think the same applies to estulticia. Both words have a Nile Crane sort of ring, if you know what I mean.

updated JUL 7, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Hi, Lazarus, and nice to see you 'round these here forums.
Well, maybe "estulticia" doesn't seem such an obscure and esoteric word because you know most of them!!
But, really, it is the kind of word that has regular folks reaching for the dictionary, you know?

Fine, it's not such an obscure word, but it is a higher register that quotidian lexicon, agreed? That's why I opted for "bêtise," because it's also a bit "rebuscada".

Hi, Heidi!
Cool site. Very busy. Very facebook or myspace, but with a loftier goal. Congrats.

Hiya, Eddy, and thanks for the definition. I guess we should also mention that it is pronounced like the words bay-TEASE.

D

updated JUL 7, 2008
posted by wtf
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Bêtise
Noun - a stupid mistake
folly, imbecility, stupidity, foolishness
error, fault, mistake - a wrong action attributable to bad judgment or ignorance or inattention; "he made a bad mistake"; "she was quick to point out my errors"; "I could understand his English in spite of his grammatical faults"

updated JUL 7, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Betise''? I have no idea, but I agree with Lazarus on the definition, perfect for Spain at the moment!

updated JUL 7, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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It is not an obscure and esoteric word, but a very useful one when describing the political panorama in Spain, hehe.

I don't think there is an equivalent in English which is exclusively literary.

updated JUL 7, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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