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Does anyone know how you would translate the phrase 'dar mucho de sí'. The context is how the impact of a dicsovery da mucho de sí.

Thanks

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updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by Hannah-Waterhouse

5 Answers

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In all honesty Tad, I wouldn't know. My grammar is not the best, having learnt this language some thirty five ago.

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Hi James
It is a reference from "Collins" dictionary "dar de sí" to go a long way. I assumed the mucho meant "very".
Our Spanish teacher has used "poder dar de sí" and informed us that it meant to stretch oneself so I can see where you are coming from.
However, if you think about it, to stretch is to go further, particularly when talking about food or drink. Ex, My son and his family arrived but we managed to stretch the food. In England at least, this would mean the meal has gone a long way. Anyway, as you know I am no expert. If it is wrong, I will blame Collins.

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Eddy, where did you find that meaning? I have never heard it, and it doesn't appear in my references.

The most common meaning (AFAIK) of dar de sí is to give or stretch. For example, if someone buys a pair of shoes, they might intentionally buy them in a size that is a little tight, because "se dan de sí con el uso," that is, they will give/stretch with use.

However, neither your definition nor mine seems to fit the context given here. Hannah, could you give us the entire sentence in Spanish'

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Thanks Eddy, the 'sí' then, in this case is 'itself'.
(I first read it as 'to give of yes').

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by tad
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Hi Hannah - Welcome to the forum.

Dar de sí - To go a long way.
Dar mucho de sí - To go a very long way
This is normally associated with food or drink.

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by Eddy