Other ways of saying de nada?

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In english we have a multitude of these; no problem, my pleasure, don't mention it, and my favorite no worries, to just mention a few.
What other ones does spanish have for these situations'

22603 views
updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by Mz-Badger

16 Answers

1
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Also used (not so common as "de nada"):
"Por nada"
"No hay de que"

updated DIC 13, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
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Oh come on James, you'll think of something.

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by motley
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Spain, France & England developed the rules of grammar & I think they are the rules we need to follow.

I'm stunned! I don't know what to say.

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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In the matter of English as well as Spanish & French. Spain, France & England developed the rules of grammar & I think they are the rules we need to follow. Latin America, the US & Canada, certainly have their own way of expressing things, however, the rules are still the rules.
If I remember correctly, in English you shouldn't end a sentence with a preposition.
But we do it all the time & it even sounds a little strange if we say it correctly.

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by motley
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But you are assuming there is a "right way." I'm sure most Spaniards would agree that Castillian Spanish is the correct form, and while there is something to that argument, I don't think it's entirely valid. No more than it would be to say that British English is "right" and American English is "wrong." There are more than twice as many Mexicans as Spaniards, so if you go by majority, then Mexican Spanish is more "right" than Castillian Spanish.

I agree with Bill. We should embrace all the various forms of Spanish. I'm not talking about mistakes that arise through ignorance, such as spelling hacer as aser, or escribir as escrivir, but rather the accepted dialects of the many regions where Spanish is spoken.

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I feel that if you are going to learn a language, learn it the right way. Proper grammar, correct spelling including accents. We will make plenty of mistakes anyway.

I probably should rephrase that, "it should be taught the right way", we will adopt those regional differences quickly enough.

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by motley
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Dios mio, I missed the accent mark of qué.
Silly mistake. When on earth will I ever be able to learn Spanish properly :(

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by giti
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Regarding the use of "no problema" as a response to Gracias. Admittedly, I am not a native Spanish speaker..far from it. Why do you think I joined SpanishDict? I live three months out of the year living in Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico and I speak and listen to many native Spanish speakers. I can tell you for certain that "no problema" is not an uncommon way to respond to gracias in Puerto and I am not talking about responses just to me from my "foreigner's mouth" but also as a response from one native to another. Maybe it is the prevalent surf culture or the laid back attitude, but it is used commonly.

What bothers me with some of the responses on our forums (fortunately a small minority) is the ___|\___|__(fill in the blank) centric viewpoint that people tend to express. Sometimes different regions having different ways of expressing the same message, but it is all good. Sharing the different ways of expression of different countries is both interesting and informative. In my opinion, and only my opinion, carrying it beyond that point and ridiculing someone's input just because they haven't heard it themselves, is unnecessary and shows either arrogance or ignorance.

updated JUL 10, 2008
posted by Bill-H
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I like what el Chavo sometimes says. (El Chavo del Ocho, Chesperito etc. Hugely popular in Mexico and in the US)

"No hay por donde."

Will K

updated JUL 9, 2008
posted by Will-Kinney2
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Muchas gracias a todos!

updated JUL 9, 2008
posted by Mz-Badger
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Yes! Thank you for pointing that out. That one is SO common here in the US that it has almost become English. Except that it is usually "No problemo." "No problem" has to be "No hay problema," but I don't think that is very common as a response to "gracias."

Other expressions are:

Con mucho gusto.
El placer es mio.
Por nada.

updated JUL 9, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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In spain "de nada" is used for to reply a gratitude.

  • "Thank you so much for that little bit of information, Mr. Harper."
  • "De nada."

"de nada" means it not have importance, It is nothing

updated JUL 9, 2008
posted by iker
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As giti said, "No hay de qué" (with the accent) is another fairly common way to say "de nada", but is sounds somewhat politer.

In Spain some people say (colloquially):

¡Gracias!
¡Las que tú tienes!

updated JUL 9, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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"No problema" sounds like taken from "Terminator II". I don't know in other countries, but in Spain we'd only expect those words out of a foreigner's mouth.

updated JUL 9, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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'no hay de que' also

updated JUL 9, 2008
posted by giti