Acordar, recordar, etc.

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Which are the proper usages and meanings of acordar, acordarse, recordar and recordarse? There seems to be much intermingling of the terms in common speech. For example, if I want to say, "I remember him" is it "lo recuerdo, me recuerdo de él, lo acuerdo, me acuerdo de él, etc.? Also, doesn't acordarse also mean "to agree"? And doesn't recordar (non-reflexive) mean "to remind" as in, recuerdeme mañana, por favor"/

4780 views
updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by Rich

13 Answers

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Enterado. Gracias otra vez por la ayuda.

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by Rich
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Rich, read all the messages again carefully, and you'll see that we all agree (todos estamos de acuerdo) that you should probably forget about acordarse meaning "to agree."

I remember it =
Lo recuerdo =
Me lo acuerdo

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Ok, so "acordarse" can mean both "to remember" and "to be in agreement or harmony with". Then what is the best and/or simplest, most common way to say "I remember it, him, her, that, etc.? Would it me "me lo acuerdo", la recuerdo", etc.? Mil gracias por sus apreciados comentarios.

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by Rich
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Well, I spelled it wrong.

highfalutin:
Informal: Pompous or pretentious

"H.L. Mencken, in his famous book The American Language, mentions highfalutin as an example of the many native U.S. words coined during the 19th-century period of vigorous growth. Although highfalutin is characteristic of American folk speech, it is not a true regionalism because it has always occurred in all regions of the country, with its use and popularity spurred by its appearance in print. The origin of highfalutin, like that of many folk expressions, is obscure. It has been suggested that the second element, 'falutin, comes from the verb flute'hence high-fluting, a comical indictment of people who think too highly of themselves."

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I don't know in the UK, but I've never seen it before. I'll check it up! wink

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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Thanks for teaching me a great new word, altisonante!

I guess that's an altisonante way of saying high-fallutin' (now there's a word I bet you don't use much in the UK!).

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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No cotizar si no se acuerda con la totalidad de los requisitos.

Ahora que lo leo, me doy cuenta de que lo he visto antes, pero suena a lenguaje técnico jurídico-administrativo, es decir, innecesariamente rebuscado y altisonante.

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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But "acordarse de" clearly means "to remember," not "to agree."

Again, I'm not advocating the use of acordarse to express "to agree," since "estar de acuerdo" is the most natural way to express this. But acordarse does seem to be used to mean agree sometimes. One example I found is:

No cotizar si no se acuerda con la totalidad de los requisitos.

But let's end by agreeing (!) that it is safe for a learner to remember (!) that acordarse de is used to express "to remember," and estar de acuerdo for "to agree."

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I have never heard this "acordarse con".

I've checked my dictionary of uses of Spanish prepositions, and it doesn't mention it.

The dictionary Manuel Seco (4638 pags, and a comprehensive description of the use of prepositions) says that is a rare construction, and its example has no preposition, although I guess it could have had one.

The Diccionario de uso del español de María Moliner (otros dos tomos) mentions it, but adds no comments about the preposition, and provides no example.

Other single volume dictionaries don't even mention that it exists.

I wouldn't recommend anyone using this structure.

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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I hesitate to disagree with a native speaker, but my dictionary, which is usually very reliable, does disagree with you. In fact, it gives an example that is almost the same as the one I gave: "No se acuerdan con nosotros." The second definition of acordarse is "ponerse de acuerdo."

I agree that "estar de acuerdo" is the far more common way to express "to agree," but I was trying to answer Rich's specific question ('Also, doesn't acordarse also mean "to agree"'').

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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"ÿl no se acuerda con nosotros" is "He doesn't agree with us" ="ÿl no está de acuerdo con nosotros"

Recordar= Bring something or samebody to a memory = Traer a la memoria algo o a álguien.
Acordar= Determine or resolve something (unilateral form, common agreement, or by majority of votes)= Determinar o resolver algo deliberadamente, de común acuerdo o por mayoría de votos.

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by Vernic
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For example, if I want to say, "I remember him" is it "lo recuerdo, me recuerdo de él, lo acuerdo, me acuerdo de él, etc.'

The first and last are correct, but not the middle two. Recordarme would mean "to remind myself."

Yes, acordarse can mean to agree, but the context usually makes it clear which meaning is intended. "ÿl no se acuerda con nosotros" is "He doesn't agree with us," but "ÿl no se acuerda de nosotros" is "He doesn't remember us."

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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acordar is to do a agreement or remember.
no me acuerdo is i dont remember
agree is estoy de acuedo o esta de acuerdo.
remind is ok

updated JUN 23, 2008
posted by juan