how to say i love you in spanish?

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how do u say i love u in spanish'

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updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by donna7

15 Answers

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"Te quiero" means "I love you" but is mostly use to express your feelings toward friends, family, etc. You can also use this expression with your boyfriend, wife, etc. but in this case is used more frequently "Te amo" wich means I love you but in a more passionate/loving way.

updated NOV 4, 2008
posted by laura14
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We do use te quiero when we're speaking sexually though

If you mean in the sense of "I want you," that would be "te deseo."

"Te quiero" doesn't have any overt sexual nuance. Naturally, when you breathlessly utter it in a moment of passion, it has quite a different nuance from that when you say it to your puppy, but the basic meaning remains the same: I love you.

Also, you seem to be differentiating between romantic usage and usage with a "significant other." What would that difference be? To me, a significant other is someone you have a monogamous sexual relationship with. And I have certainly heard Mexicans use "te quiero" in the whole gamut of such relationships.

updated JUN 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I hear te quiero used romantically also and my boyfriend told me you can use it for that but where he's from they don't use te quiero to say I love you to their significant other. We do use te quiero when we're speaking sexually though.

updated JUN 30, 2008
posted by 00b6f81b
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I think it varies with location.

updated JUN 30, 2008
posted by 00b6f81b
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Of course I can't speak for the experience of others, but I have spent a total of about five months living with families in Mexico (including Mérida), and I have heard "te quiero" used in romantic contexts many times. Plus, I hear it used romantically all the time in the lyrics of Mexican songs and on Mexican TV shows, and hear "te amo" much less often. I'm not saying "te amo" isn't used, but that it is incorrect to make the clear distinction that Stephanie made.

Just one point on the graph...

updated JUN 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I'm with Stephanie on this one, here in Mexico it's the same, te amo for your significant other, te quiero for you children, family and close friends.

updated JUN 30, 2008
posted by Mz-Badger
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Stephanie, someone has given you bad advice. "Te quiero" can be said to a grandmother, a good friend, or to a hot, sweaty lover. Or a spouse of 50 years. Please read Lazarus's post above.

updated JUN 30, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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This is how it was explained to me.

Te quiero is for friends and family.

Te amo is for your significant other.

updated JUN 30, 2008
posted by 00b6f81b
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Correct? Both!

Now, in Spain (and maybe other countries), if you say "Te amo", you'll sound as if you just came out of a novel or a poem. If you say "Te quiero", you'll sound like the average lover. Both are correct, but you decide.

updated JUN 29, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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but what is the context?

perhaps with a kiss a hug mmm with actions not words; the phrase is "Te Amo"

I do not speak English only attempt to help

updated JUN 29, 2008
posted by Braulio
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Hi Tamuna
There is no need for the personal pronoun "yo". I also recommend you look at Lazarus's reply above.

updated JUN 29, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Yo te amo

updated JUN 29, 2008
posted by Tamuna
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I don't know in other countries, but in Spain people rarely say "Te amo"; "Te quiero" is the most common one.

updated JUN 29, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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"I love you" = "Te amo"

Marco

updated JUN 29, 2008
posted by Marco-T
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How about:

Te quiero.

I love how that sounds, it sounds sweet and wistful to my inglish ears.

updated JUN 29, 2008
posted by Jmarie