HomeQ&AWhat to call a mother-in-law?

What to call a mother-in-law?

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If a mother-in-law wants a warm relationship with her son's wife, what would she invite her daughter-in-law to call her, rather than "Senora"?
Thanks in advance
Daphne

PS I am writing a romantic novel with a Venezuelan hero. If anyone would like to open a private correspondence and help me with a few Spanish words and phrases, I'd be very grateful. Dictionaries and phrase books can't do it all!

31559 views
updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by Daphne

17 Answers

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Jmarie, thank's for the corrections.
"Si quiere ser respetuosa, ella podría llamarla por su nombre y tratarla de "usted"

"Tratarla de usted", convivence rules, formal or familiar way, "usted"or "tu".

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by Vernic
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Vernic, nice answer! ...I want to help you with the English, okay?
"Generational breach" is very accurate, very descriptive! There is also a common phrase, "generation gap," if you want to use it.
May be is one word, "maybe."
You don't need the infinitive after 'could' and before "use": "... she could call you by your first name, and use 'Usted.'" Any verb after "could" is just the root of the verb: "When we were growing up I could play with my sister, and use all her toys, and eat all her snacks, and she would still love me." En espanol, digame, como se dice': "Si quiera ser respetuosa, pueda ella llamarla "su nombre" y usar "usted" '

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by Jmarie
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Well, I know many "suegras" and "nueras" who have a very close relationship an they use to call each another by they own names as they were friends.
May be if the generational breach exists, or you want to be respectful, she could call you "your name" and to use "usted":
Hola, como está Daphne'.
Daphne, le gustaría acompañarme a.......'.

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by Vernic
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My mother-in-law is my Suegra. That is the only thing she lets me call her.

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by James-Graham
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In the in-law department, I just heard a new way to say that. My friend wrote that his car belonged to a "tio político mio" and on looking that up I find it's used with other relationships too -- padre politico is father in law.

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by Barbara-C
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Thank you Heidita. And everyone. I will do that.
Daphne

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by Daphne
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Yes, thank you

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by Dunia
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Dunia, "I disagree again," would be more correct. I assume you're translating "otra vez."

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by Difster
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"I disagree one more time", I think would be more correct, isn't it'

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by Dunia
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Well, I think that all in all the best way to call a mother-in-law is "BRUJA!!!!!!" (lol)

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by Dunia
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I disagree another time. I say my mother "mama", and many people do it in Spain.

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by Dunia
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I've heard to call a mother-in-law "suegra", my sister-in-law calls my mother that way, and so my father, I don't think it is unusual.

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by Dunia
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help me with a few Spanish words and phrases

Hi Daphne, you are welcome to post any sentences or words you have doubts with on the forum.

updated JUN 10, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Thanks for the clarification.
Daphne

updated JUN 9, 2008
posted by Daphne
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Maybe my example is not that good after all. My wife is Chinese, and in that language, mother is "mama" (in Spanish is "mamá"), so that's what I use with her.

Regarding my mother, I call her "mamá", and so does my wife (something my mother finds very sweet). I don't use "mama" with anyone in Spanish, as it means "breast".

updated JUN 9, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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