Brought to pass

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Hello, everyone, I was reading this quotation by Homero:
Dreams surely are difficult, confusing, and not everything in them is brought to pass for mankind. For fleeting dreams have two gates: one is fashioned of horn and one of ivory. Those which pass through the one of sawn ivory are deceptive, bringing tidings which come to nought, but those which issue from the one of polished horn bring true results when a mortal sees them.

What does that expression mean'

6371 views
updated ABR 11, 2012
posted by WilIbanez

16 Answers

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I have heard por seguro, but use seguramente

updated AGO 4, 2008
posted by Millie
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Is the expression "de seguro", that has been used in the translations, common in some South American Countries? In Spain it is "seguro" / "seguramente" = "surely".
"De seguro" sounds quite horrible.

updated AGO 4, 2008
posted by Dunia
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una hecha de cuerno y una de marfil.
porque suenos flugaces tienen dos puertas: una es de cuerno y una de marfil
los que pasan por la puerta de marfil asserado son enganosos y traen noticias que no llegan a nada
pero aguellos que pasan por (la puerta) de cuerno pullido traen resultados verdaderos cuando un mortal los ve.

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by Millie
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I know I'm late in adding to this discussion, but "brought to pass" has been troubling me ever since I first read this post. I finally had to look it up, to make sure I was right. Here in Colombia, "bring to pass", at least in my circles, is usually translated "llevar a cabo".

Now that I've looked it up in the dictionary and found that I'm right, I won't worry that my Spanish is COMPLETELY rotten. smile

Calvo

updated AGO 3, 2008
posted by CalvoViejo
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Hey James and Wil,
Shouldn't it be marfil instead of ébano? (Hey Heidita, I used the double-click! jejejej ).

updated AGO 2, 2008
posted by Valerie
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Tm, open a new thread next time.

updated AGO 2, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Nada hay tan dulce como la patria , aunque uno tenga en tierra extraña y lejana la mansión más opulenta.

This is one very similar.

Yo por mi parte no conozco imagen a los ojos de un hombre que sea más bonita que la de su propio país.

updated AGO 2, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Here is the exact quotation:

I, for one, know of no sweeter sight for man's eyes than his own country.

Yo por mi parte desconozco ninguna vista a los ojos de un hombre que sea más maravillosa que (la de) su propio país.

There are probably errors in this, but someone will fix them.

updated AGO 1, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I think that to analyse Homer(Homero') you would need to go back 1000 years in time,when mens beliefs were different and also the gods that they worshipped but I have a favourite quote from him,if Wil or James could translate it I would be very grateful!
"There is no sweeter sight for a mans eyes than his own country!"
-Homer(Homero),The Odyssey.

updated AGO 1, 2008
posted by TimEivissa
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Nice, your spanish is better than mine! I'll speak english only from now on!

updated AGO 1, 2008
posted by WilIbanez
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Please note that I have corrected my own corrections above. hehe

I just realized that you are a native speaker of Spanish. I hope you don't take offense to my suggestions! Just trying to help. Take whatever is good and toss the rest.

updated AGO 1, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Los sueños son de seguro difíciles, confusos y no todo en ellos le puede suceder a la humanidad. Es que para sueños fugaces hay tienen dos puertas: una hecha con un de cuerno y la otra de ébano. Los que pasan por la de ébano aserrado son engañosos y traen noticias que no llevan a nada. Pero aquellos los que emanan de la de cuerno pulido traen verdaderos resultados cuando un mortal los ve.

That's my version (well, actually, your version, with my corrections).

updated AGO 1, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Los sueños son de seguro difíciles, confusos y no todo en ellos le puede suceder a la humanidad. Es que para sueños fugaces hay dos puertas: una hecha con un cuerno y otra de ébano. Los que pasan por la de ébano aserrado son engañosos y traen noticias que no llevan a nada. Pero aquellos que emanan de la de cuerno pulido traen verdaderos resultados cuando un mortal los ve.

Thanks a lot!

updated AGO 1, 2008
posted by WilIbanez
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Pretty good, but a few comments:

In "For fleeting dreams have two gates," "for" means "because," so "para" isn't correct, while "porque" or the like would be correct. "Es que sueños fugaces tienen dos puertas..."

"Fashioned of" means "made from." So, rather than "decorado con," it would be "hecha de" Puerta is feminine, so "uno" must be "una," and "otro" must be "otra."

Rather than "aquellos," I'd say "los" (meaning los sueños).

"Those which issue from" means "those which come out of." Therefore, it would be something like "Los que emanan de" or "Los que surgen de." Or just "Los que salen de."

updated AGO 1, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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I translated the whole quotation into Spanish, corrections are always welcome.

Los sueños son de seguro difíciles, confusos y no todo en ellos le puede suceder a la humanidad. Para sueños fugaces hay dos puertas: uno decorado con un cuerno y otro de ébano. Aquellos que pasan por la de ébano aserrado son engañosos y traen noticias que no llevan a nada. Pero aquellos cuyo tema pasa por la de cuerno pulido traen verdaderos resultados cuando un mortal los ve.

updated AGO 1, 2008
posted by WilIbanez