mortgage terms

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Im trying to help my husband and i have no idea about most mortgage terms? I have looked most up but I have to ask a client if they have a arm coming up and I dont think you say it the way i think!

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updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by jessi2

8 Answers

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I know, I would have said brazo!
thanks everyone, I'm going to use what I learned and will let you know how it goes.

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by jessi2
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I don't think that's right, at least not if the translation is to be used for the US housing market. Mortgages here come in two main types: fixed and adjustable. The latter means that it is una hipoteca con la cual se ajusta cada año la tasa de interés.

A better translation might be hipoteca de tasa variable (ARM). This is used at the following site.

http://www.venturacountystar.com/news/2008/jan/12/la-verdad-sobre-el-mercado-de-la-hipoteca/

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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The "arm" definitely threw me!!

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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In this case we would simply use the term: hipoteca.

¿Tiene Usted una hipoteca'

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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That is exactly what I needed ...ARM. Sorry about the badly written english.. I was on the way out the door!

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by jessi2
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Her English is badly written and hard to understand, but she wants a translation for ARM (not arm!), which is adjustable rate mortgage, which may be "hipoteca de tipo variable" in Spanish.

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Are you asking yourself whether you know about mortgage terms''

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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I don't understand this. Do you want something translated to Spanish'

updated JUN 11, 2008
posted by jamesgv0r