what does this mean ?'?

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hidratada

1190 views
updated JUN 21, 2008
posted by elizabeth6

8 Answers

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in a cosmetic sense, couldn't it also be translated as moist? i seem to recall having a shampoo bottle once that used hidratación for moisturization. technically, you could use hydration for that, but it wouldn't be a common english usage for lotions, soaps, shampoos, et al.

updated JUN 21, 2008
posted by David-H
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Hi Elizabeth
Welcome to the forum. Before you post anything else, could you please click on the link below.

[url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A4947]http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A4947[/url]

updated JUN 21, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Probably because nothing in English follows the rule . . . well, not nothing . . . no, wait, that's a double negative

raspberry

updated JUN 20, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Ok, there is a "tada", but the word begins with "hidrat", and this beginning would probably be pronounced exactly like "hydrat" (hydrated), so just by pronouncing the word aloud and slowly should have been enought to guess, I would have thought.

I don't mean to insult anyone, but most Spanish speakers I know who have never studied English at all, and can't understand a word (say, my parents), would have recognized that word immediately as a clear spelling variant, like many other thousands of words, but English speakers really seem to struggle to do the same in reverse. I wonder why this happens, really.

updated JUN 20, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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To an English speaker, the "tada" ending and the absence of the "y" makes it appear very different. I wouldn't have guessed it. But then, I'm not always a good guesser!

updated JUN 20, 2008
posted by Natasha
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hidratada = hydrated.

There are only two letters difference between the English and the Spanish spelling of this word? Is it really that hard to spot? Most "y" in English are "i" in Spanish (hydrated - hidrated)

updated JUN 20, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
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adj. hydrous, watery, containing water

Read this before your next post

[url=http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A4947]http://my.spanishdict.com/forum/topic/show'id=1710195%3ATopic%3A4947[/url]

updated JUN 20, 2008
posted by motley
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does anyone fricken know

updated JUN 20, 2008
posted by elizabeth6