Translation for TIME OUT?

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Thanks

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updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by PPC

18 Answers

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Oh wow, how do any parents get any work done'! I would lose my mind!!!

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by Natasha
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I found this translation on the web at this site: http://www.health.state.ny.us/nysdoh/consumer/sbs/sbs_eng.htm. (This is from a brochure about preventing shaken baby syndrome.)

In English:

If nothing seems to work:
Place your baby in a safe place, like a crib or playpen, and take a time out.
Take a deep breath and count to ten.
Call a friend for support.
Call your doctor, your baby may be sick.

In Spanish:

Si nada de esto funciona:
Coloque a su bebé en un lugar seguro como una cuna o un corral, y espere un momento.
Respire profundamente y cuente hasta diez.
Pida apoyo de un amigo.
Llame a su doctor; puede ser que su bebé esté enfermo.

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by Natasha
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My daughter's a teacher here in England, ages 5 to 6 years. If a child falls down in the playground, teachers arn't allowed to comfort them. They somehow have to contact the parents at work so they can attend. Political correctness gone mad.

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by Eddy
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My husband taught elementary school for a while and was told he could not stand kids in the corner (or by his desk, etc.), because that would single them out.

Sometimes I think we've lost our collective minds . . .

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by Natasha
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Maybe this isn't common in the UK, but as Motley says, it is EXTREMELY common here in the US. The idea is that, rather than punishing a child, you give them time to calm down and start behaving better. Of course, to the child it IS punishment, so the whole thing smacks of new-age silliness to me, but I still use the phrase with my kids just because it is so pervasive in school and society, and they know what it means.

I read on another forum that, at least in Mexico (where the influence of the US is stronger), the phrase is translated literally as ""tiempo fuera." Obviously, this won't convey the intended meaning to all Spanish speakers, so other wording or a note may be required.

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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"time out" seems to be common in the US, the kids know what it means.
When I was young I had to sit in the corner.

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by motley
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I think "time out" is commonly accepted in the US, the kids know what it means.

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by motley
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I don't know about the other members, but when I was bringing up my children I would never have used the expression time out and with adults if there was a difference of opinion which was becoming heated, I would have said something like "now hold on" simply to gain time.

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by Eddy
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I'll attempt it, and then someone can correct it.

Un esposo o una esposa puede pedir un descanso de la discusión cuando no puede tratar un tópico (o un problema) de manera constructiva.

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by Natasha
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An example would be:

A spouse can call a time out when he/she is unable to deal with an issue in a constructive way.

updated JUN 19, 2008
posted by PPC
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Hi PPC
I agree with Natasha. Just give us "a" or "some" sentences in English.

updated JUN 18, 2008
posted by Eddy
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From the WordReference Supplement © 2007 WordReference.com:
time out:
time out descanso
time out pausa
time out (computers) tiempo de espera (ordenadores)
time out (sports) tiempo muerto (deportes)
Compound Forms:
time-out nf desconexión por tiempo (informática)
time-out nm tiempo muerto (deporte)
time-out nm vencimiento

updated JUN 18, 2008
posted by motley
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I have a parenting book (in English) which talks about "reflective sit-time". I mention this because you may need to get more specific in what you are trying to translate; "time-out" alone probably is not going to work in Spanish. Valerie suggests "time apart"; other options might be:

quiet time for calming down
time apart for reflection

or something like that.

Can you give us a sentence'

updated JUN 18, 2008
posted by Natasha
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maybe "tiempo aparto" .... What does someone more advanced than I think about that'

updated JUN 18, 2008
posted by Valerie
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PPC
I take it that neither of my two suggestions fit your bill then.

updated JUN 18, 2008
posted by Eddy