panquecito

0
votes

Hello,
My mexican friend texted this to me ...
Mi panquecito, prometeme que cocinaras 'chicken tikka'.
And I dont know what does panquecito and prometeme means.

Is the word 'prometeme' some conjugated form of the verb 'prometer'? From the rest of the sentence I believe he is saying "promise that you will..."
Can anybody help me?

Gracias
Giti.

7200 views
updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by giti

10 Answers

1
vote

I would say: "Trae tu chaqueta también. Esta lloviendo mucho aquí" (when you say "aquí", you are implying that you are in India). Also, the verb "llevar" is more used to indicate you are taking something somewhere else, not to where the other subject is. If you are bringing something to my location, you should use "traer".

updated DIC 2, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
0
votes

Thank you so much Lazarus.
Gracias
Giti.

updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by giti
0
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Hi Lazarus

*"Traer" is used when you bring something to the place where the speaker is.
"Llevar" is used when you bring something to a different place.

The same distinction applies to "ir" and "venir".*

For some reason, the above reply appeared three identical times, obviously by mistake. I have deleted two of them.

updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by Eddy
0
votes

"Traer" is used when you bring something to the place where the speaker is.
"Llevar" is used when you bring something to a different place.

The same distinction applies to "ir" and "venir".

updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by lazarus1907
0
votes

Muchas gracias Dacron y Guillermo ,
Busqué por significado de 'take along? en spandict. Encontré 'llevar? y 'traer? pero me confundido.
(I want to say ... I searched for the meaning of 'take along? in spandict . I found 'llevar? and 'traer? but I got confused. )
Gracias
Giti.

updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by giti
0
votes

Tu traducción es correcta. Se entiende perfectamente
puedes hacerla de varias formas, pero como has puesto esta bien.
puedes cambiar= Con exceso, por Está lloviendo en exceso o está lloviendo mucho/copiosamente

updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by DaCRoN
0
votes

Thank you so much Elisabeth and Dacron.
I want to send him a message in Spanish---|
'Take along your jacket also. It is raining heavily here in India.'

My try ---|
'Lleva contigo tu chaqueta también. Aquí en la India está lloviendo con exceso'
Please can you check my translation attempt?

Gracias
Giti

updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by giti
0
votes

In Mexico, Panquecito is diminutive of Panque (bizcocho)
Panquecito (magdalena, bizcochito,etc..)
Prometeme (Promete+me)= Promise me

In this sentence, the word panquecito is the same that bomboncito in spain; term of affection...
My sweetie, promise me that you will cook chicken tikka for me

updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by DaCRoN
0
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My "panquecito", promise me that you'll cook chicken tikka

updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by elisabeth
0
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a) I can´t answer about panquecito but it sounds like a term of endearment. (We don´t use it in Spain as far as I know, so it´s probably Mexican)

b) Prométeme means promise me. It´s composed of two words:
1. Promete imperative familiar (tú) of the verb PROMETER
2. me : me

The pronoun (in this case me) is always joined to the imperative affirmative form (prométeme)

You need an accent (tilde) on prométeme but not on promete

updated JUN 16, 2008
posted by elisabeth