spoiled brat, temper tantrum

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How would you translate the following? (I saw the discussion about brat / mocoso, but am not sure it's the best fit.)

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Her little boy is a spoiled brat! She gives him all the candy he wants at the store, and whenever he throws a temper tantrum she gives in.

4137 views
updated MAY 21, 2008
posted by Natasha

5 Answers

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I actually used cede at first, but decided that the register didn't match that of "give in," so I changed it. I know that darse por vencido means give up, rather than give in, but the meanings are very close, and I thought the register was closer that way. That is, I was thinking that "concede" is more formal in register than "give in." I guess that is not the case with the Spanish equivalents.

Thanks for the comments.

updated MAY 21, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Muchas gracias a todos. ¡Espero que mi bebé tan bonito no se crezca a ser un mocoso malcriado! Pues tiene menos de seis meses, todavía está monono, ¿no?

grin

updated MAY 21, 2008
posted by Natasha
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¡Su hijo/crío,/niño es un mocoso malcriado! Le da todos los caramelos que quiere en la tienda, y cuando él coge un berrinche, ella cede.

Ella se da por vencida is not the same as give in, in my opinion. It literally means: to accept defeat. But in this case it means she will do again what the child wants, so she "cede".

The other changes are simply Spanish preferences (from Spain).

updated MAY 21, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Gustavo, I understand your Spanish, but forgive me, I do not understand your English. What is "bogger boy"''?

I think "niño malcriado" or "niño consentido" is what I was looking for -- gracias!

updated MAY 21, 2008
posted by Natasha
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¡Su niño es un mocoso malcriado! Le da todos los caramelos que quiere en el mercado, y cuando
él se agarra un berrinche, ella se da por vencida.

That's how I would say it in gringoese. (g)

updated MAY 21, 2008
posted by 00bacfba