How do you define your Spanish level?

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Hi, friends!
I've been wondering how we can define our Spanish levels, especially when try to find a right study-aid. If somebody took a very first year of College Spanish course, would you say they are already intermediate since they've completed the basic? What about some years of high school Spanish classes? Are those 3 years(') of high school Spanish classes usually equivalent to the first year of College Spanish? or maybe higher''? I've never taken a high school Spanish class so I have no clue. Any idea'

6290 views
updated MAY 27, 2008
posted by judy2

9 Answers

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Ay, I haven't even begun to look at the future tense....
Damn! I'm still a beginner...!!! jejeje...

updated MAY 27, 2008
posted by gitte-danésa
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I guess only the best way to find a right material is to go to the bookstore. Well, that's very true. I'll keep looking! wink
Thank you, James! I'll check the book you recommended too.

updated MAY 27, 2008
posted by judy2
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How do you usually find a right study-aid for your level? Do you just to buy and see if it works? There are so many books out there and it's not easy to find the right one for me.

Judy,
I personally would want to see the book before buying it.

Have you tried your local library? How about a university library? Also, the bookstores where I live are full of language study guides and texts. If you find a good book that is expensive, you can try finding it online for a lower price. Amazon sells used books, and they are also on eBay, although the shipping costs often negate any savings. In my area, there are also a couple of clearance stores that sell used textbooks for very reasonable prices.

My favorite study book of all is "Breaking Out of Beginner's Spanish," by Joseph J. Keenan.

updated MAY 26, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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jejejejejejejejejejejejejeje

Way to go, difster, way to go......jejeje

updated MAY 23, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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I have yet to find any study aids for the level You Suck At Spanish. But I'll keep trying wink

updated MAY 23, 2008
posted by Difster
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Thank you guys for sharing your opinions. But when I try to find some study-aid books/CDs, even though it says it's for intermediate, for example, they sometimes look too basic, or too advanced. I've also read many of reviews of those materials in Amazon.com site, and people have very different opinions on the levels. It's not consistent at all. That's why I get confused. It's so strange. I think there should be a little more stable definitions on the levels so that learners can spot their right materials easier....

How do you usually find a right study-aid for your level? Do you just to buy and see if it works? There are so many books out there and it's not easy to find the right one for me.

updated MAY 23, 2008
posted by judy2
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Hi Judy, I like your dog!!

Intermediate in my opinion is : conversation level, basics. Good vocabulary, all basic tenses.

Advanced: use of passive, conditionals, idioms, good conversation level, ...

updated MAY 23, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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I would say beginner is anything in present tense, intermediate is when you can talk about past or future events, an expert would be able to have a conversation with a native and completely fluent is when you could write College papers in Spanish (not Spanish course papers but others). But thats just my opinion and not how it's officially graded anywhere.

updated MAY 23, 2008
posted by Regan
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Hola Judy! I would say when one can speak and comprehend what is spoken is a good intermediate level.

updated MAY 22, 2008
posted by Cooly-High