HomeQ&Aoverwhelmed

overwhelmed

0
votes

If I want to say I am overwhelmed by someone's generosity, or something like that

Me siento agobiada por tu generosidad...? o abrumada?
both of these words seem to also carry a negative connotation. Is there something better'

2920 views
updated MAY 3, 2008
posted by Barbara-C

9 Answers

0
votes

It really does -- thanks for explaining it so well.

updated MAY 3, 2008
posted by Barbara-C
0
votes

That lacks the emotion I want to convey, which in English really is "overwhelmed." It's a delicate thing that I want to get just right-- more so because I used "generosity" only as an example of what a person could be overwhelmed by. It is actually a reaction to the intensity of someone's expression of affection.
How about that....

updated MAY 2, 2008
posted by Barbara-C
0
votes

A way to put it could be: "Me siento impresionada por tu generosidad"

updated MAY 2, 2008
posted by Dunia
0
votes

"He quedado asombrada de tu genrosidad" doesn't sound well. It's better to say: "tu generosidad me ha dejado asombrada"

updated MAY 2, 2008
posted by Dunia
0
votes

this is a wonderful discussion.

Should a woman put an a on the end of all of these? conmovida, asombrada..... '

updated MAY 1, 2008
posted by Barbara-C
0
votes

In truth the use of word like agobiado, consternado, abrumado seem apropiate in a tragic or worring situation.
Asombrado: Is not very kind to suggest that the generosity is not a common act in that person.
Conmovido: Implied that have been touched emotions or feelings like the thankfulness or may be sympathy / admiration.

updated MAY 1, 2008
posted by Vernic
0
votes

Both James and Gustavo get it right. You shouldn't say abrumada or agobiada, these imply a negative attitude. Another option: "he quedado (o estoy) asombrada de tu generosidad."

updated MAY 1, 2008
posted by Gabriel
0
votes

Hello there.

Pues si, no es los mismo decir : " agobiada" que ""abrumada" la diferencia es muy sutil, pero existe, sobre todo por el tono en que algunas veces hablamos.
Both of them means an "imposition" that you do not ask and because of that sometimes people could accept that "imposition" as gift ( which means in a good way ) or as a burden ( in not so good way ). As I said before the difference is very shrewd . It is up to people.
For example:
Me siento abrumada por tu generosidad (... y agradecida , muchisimas gracias, no esperaba menos de ti ) It could be the complete sentence for a good way to employ this expression. You are very thanked, because that people is helping you in something that you need.

Me siento agobiada por tu generosidad . You know that sometimes you really need some ( or a lot of ) help witn something that you can not resolve by yourself, and somebody help you, but then you feel a commitment ( a moral compomise or obligation ) to give back this help, and you do not want that responsability with that person. In this way is not so good, you feel this generosity like a imposition, because you really do not want it from that particular person.

I hope this help you.
Rebeca.

updated MAY 1, 2008
posted by scarlet
0
votes

I wonder if you could express this as "Tu generosidad me ha dejado boquiabierta" or "Me quedo boquiabierta por tu generosidad." The idea of the English is that the generosity is so great that it has left your mind and emotions in a dazed state, unable to process such magnanimity, and that is pretty much what the Spanish says. There are probably other ways to express it as well.

updated MAY 1, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.
SOCIAL NETWORKS
APPS