hacerse falta vs. faltarse

0
votes

A friend asked me about the difference between the following, and I couldn't give a good answer.

Me falta (el) dinero.
Me hace falta (el) dinero.

I told him that I think they both just mean "I need money," but I wonder if there is any significant difference.

12430 views
updated MAY 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba

5 Answers

0
votes

En efecto , muy sutil. jejej

updated MAY 5, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

That sort of makes sense, Heidita. Based on your explanation, I guess when I say "Me haces falta" (I miss you), I am saying that I need you in a general way, not that I don't have enough of you.

Pero la diferencia es sutil, ¿no?

Thanks to you, too.

updated MAY 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

I'm no linguist but they do seem the same to me.

That's good news, because I couldn't think what the difference would be.

I see your point about "more money," and in English we might also express this as "I don't have enough money." But sometimes "I need money" can also imply "I need more money," as in "I'd like to buy that new motorcycle, but I need money." It's unlikely the speaker has no money at all.

Thanks!

updated MAY 5, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
0
votes

Very funny, Javier, yes, who doesn't!!

Well, to the point is that there IS a difference:

me falta dinero.

You want to go to the cinema and have just 3 ', but the cinema costs 6? so you need 3?

Here we would use: Me falta dinero (to complete the sum needed)

Me hace falta dinero: I need money, general sense, for everything.

updated MAY 5, 2008
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

I'm no linguist but they do seem the same to me. However instead of 'I need money', I see more as "I need more money". It may not be in all instances but I think the implication is that you already have a certain amount of money but you don't have enough for what you needed.
Then again it could mean what you said, James. However must people would say: 'Necesito dinero' = 'I need money'.
And who doesn't'

updated MAY 5, 2008
posted by Javier