HomeQ&AThe difference in bien and bueno.

The difference in bien and bueno.

0
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I always thought that bien essentially equaled "well" or a state of being while bueno was the English equilavent of good. If I were to say "Mi español es no muy bueno" ...would that be correct? I can't recall the specific example, but at times when I use these two words it seems like I get some funny looks...

17342 views
updated ENE 19, 2011
posted by Randy

23 Answers

1
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Parece que los dos se pueden usar.

? gente (de) bien (=los ricos) well-off people, well-to-do people

Creo que "gente bien" es una manera corta de decir "gente bien nacida."

updated ENE 19, 2011
posted by 00bacfba
1
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Elguapo,
Your examples don't support your statement that bién can function as an adjective. Can you think of any examples of such a case?

Randy should be aware that, at least in parts of Latin America, he will hear people say "Está bueno." In fact, that phrase gets nearly two million googits. The nuance is different from "es bueno."

BTW, while Dunia has already explained that bueno must come (as buen) before the noun corredor above, I'll add that you have to use an article (un/una) whenever a noun is modified by an adjective.

ÿl es marinero.
ÿl es un buen marinero.

Ella es jugadora.
Ella es una jugadora magnífica.

updated ENE 19, 2011
posted by 00bacfba
1
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we don't use the personal pronoun

Gracias....comprendo

updated ENE 19, 2011
posted by Dunia
1
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Your explanation es ok.

But it is: es un buen corredor (he runs very fast)

Es un corredor bueno (it sounds as if you're saying the runner is a kind person)

It isn't the same to say:

Es una gran persona (moral size)
Es un persona grande (physical size)

updated ENE 19, 2011
posted by Dunia
0
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lol, ever read a thread and feel like you have learned something and yet you know nothing still. I searched this because a student asked me and I could only answer "lo que suena bien." Which really doesn't help them because the are still learning how is is supposed to sound. =)

updated ENE 19, 2011
posted by n8er8er
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Ahh, bien! Gracias, heidita

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by gitte-danésa
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Gente bien en España no se usa. Y no se considería correcto, vamos suena raro.

en España se ha impuesto la traducción del inglés: gente guapa (beautiful people)

Bien y bueno, al principio de la frase es prácticamente lo mismo.
Well, let's see:
bien, veamos...

bueno, veamos

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Thank you, Randy, I was wondering about the same.

I would like to add a question. When you use 'bien' and bueno' at the beginning of a sentence, what is the difference? And when you just use it as a short answer or comment?
Is "Bien,...." meaning "Good,..."
- and "Bueno,..." meaning "Well,..." '

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by gitte-danésa
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James, I feel the same way about this site! It's great to have a place to not only learn more, but especially to be corrected and get explanations for it!
My boyfriend and his friends NEVER correct me, unless I force them, haha! 'Cause they just think it's cool I'm trying to speak spanish at all..

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by gitte-danésa
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Okay, pero a mi no me suena bien eso. quizas para otros paises si esta bien dicho.

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by Idalmis
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I agree with you Gustavo, "gente de bien" también quiere decir gente buena o gente de buena posición (los ricos).

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by Idalmis
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No, gente bien is definitely correct. There is a telenovela and a magazine of that name, and a movie with that title.

http://www.gentebien.info/

I think a good translation of this in many cases would be "upscale."

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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Para mi "gente bien" no esta bien dicho o estoy equivocada'

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by Idalmis
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You mean "Son gente de bien" and "ellos son de buena familia"

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by Idalmis
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Wierd language isn't it. Oops, Weird

updated MAY 12, 2008
posted by Eddy
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