capa y espada

0
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Hi, one of my vocabulary words in English class is capa y espada.
And I have to make a sentence with it in English context.
It was clued that it means clandestine, done underneath the table, etc. (such as in the black market).
But I'm not sure how to put it in a sentence that makes sense.
I looked it up but all I was getting was a lot of spanish sentences.

Does anyone know how to use it correctly in English context?

Thank you smile

12078 views
updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by ask-

15 Answers

1
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There appears to be some confusion between the two expressions "a capa y espada" and "de capa y espada."

a capa y espada = adverb, meaning with all possible force or energy, at all costs
de capa y espada = adjective which could mean cloak-and-dagger (though of course una espada = a sword, not a dagger); used mainly to describe 17th century dramas with lots of swordfighting and other crowd-pleasing action. "las películas de capa y espada" could be better rendered as "potboilers".

most of the above is from the Real Academia Española Diccionario del Estudiante; for more on "cloak and dagger" here is the opening quote from Wikipedia:

Cloak and dagger is a term sometimes used to refer to situations involving espionage, mystery, or even assassination. The phrase dates from the early 19th century. It is a translation from the French de cape et d'epee and Spanish comedia de capa y espada. The French and Spanish phrases refer to a genre of drama in which the main characters actually wore cloaks and carried swords. In 1840, Longfellow wrote, "In the afternoon read La Dama Duende of Calderón - a very good comedy of 'cloak and sword'." Charles Dickens subsequently used the phrase a year later.

updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by steve4
1
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I'm going to hate myself for this but

Why can't we stop all the cloak and dagger stuff and get down to the nitty gritty

updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by motley
1
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Welcome to the forum, ask!

I wonder if i am understanding this correctly: you are supposed to use the Spanish words in an English sentence?

I am sure I must be mistaken.

A capa y espada means: to defend something tooth and nail

So, for instance:

she defended her point of view tooth and nail.

I wonder if that sentence is correct, I am not a native speaker.

In Spanish it would be :

Defendió su punto de vista a capa y espada.

She defended her brother fiercely.

Defendió a su hermano a capa y espada.

updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by 00494d19
1
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Helo there.

I really don't know how this sentence means " secret behevior " I think this is utterly mistaken, at least in spanish.
When you say " a capa y espada" it means "struggle with force for something that you want or desire", now in peacefull time, you fight with your intelect, work and will.
" Voy a luchar a capa y espada por ese trabajo".
Because in the was exactly the meanning, men fight for their honor, love or country with a "capa" in their left arm (rolling) and with their "espada" in their right arm.
Rebeca

updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by scarlet
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A good translation of "de capa y espada" might be swashbuckling, especially when referring to works of literature, theater, etc. of the 16th and 17th Centuries.

updated JUN 6, 2012
posted by sethfromsomewhere
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Steve is right - there are two possible interpretations of the phrase. 'A capa y espada' would be similar to saying to defend with buckler and shield, that is, with everything in my powers.
'De capa y espada' = cloak and dagger. Espionage, etc.

updated DIC 2, 2008
posted by PrimerAngel
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Happy to participate. Gracias.

updated MAY 4, 2008
posted by steve4
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En wikipedia también, encontramos:

Comedia de capa y espada
Se denomina comedia de capa y espada a uno de los subgéneros dramáticos del Teatro clásico español del Siglo de Oro.
Se define como aquella pieza teatral de tema galante en tres jornadas cuya acción ocurre entre personas que no exceden el nivel social de nobles y caballeros, como por ejemplo El acero de Madrid de Lope de Vega. Es uno de los cuatro tipos de la comedia del Siglo de Oro: los restantes son la comedia de enredo, con la que a veces se confunde, la comedia de carácter y la comedia de figurón.
El dramaturgo Francisco Bances Candamo, en su Theatro de los theatros de los passados y presentes siglos, cuya primera versión redactó en 1689-90, clasifica la comedia española del momento en dos grandes grupos: amatorias e historiales. Las comedias amatorias las divide en «comedias de fábrica» y «comedias de capa y espada», y estas últimas las define como
Aquéllas cuios personages son sólo caualleros particulares, como don Juan, Don Diego, etcétera, y los lances se reducen a duelos, a celos, a esconderse el galán, a taparse la Dama, y, en fin, a aquellos sucesos más caseros de un galanteo.

updated MAY 4, 2008
posted by steve4
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NIce post, Steve!

Welcome to the forum!!

updated MAY 4, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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jejejeje, motley, you are being naughty...jeje

updated MAY 4, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Exactly what I said before. !!

updated MAY 4, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Well, cloak and dagger, in english dictionaries, mean:

cloak-and-dagger behaviour is when people behave in a very secret way, often when it is not really necessary. Is all this cloak-and-dagger stuff necessary? Why can't we just meet in a café like everyone else?

So... could I just replace cloak and dagger with capa y espada and it would make sense?

Is all thsi capa y espada stuff necessary? Why can't we just meet in a café like everyone else'

updated MAY 3, 2008
posted by ask-
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According to Collins dictionary "capa y espada" is cloak and dagger
Example given
Una comedia de capa y espada - a cloak and dagger mystery

updated MAY 3, 2008
posted by Eddy
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Hi motley, yes, this is the literal meaning, but figuratively speaking, it means to defend fiercely, intensely...

updated MAY 3, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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I think it is cloak and dagger

all I can think of is a movie, a murder mystery or a spy novel.

updated MAY 3, 2008
posted by motley