Does anybody know what this means?

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Te Amo Cuidate mi nino que dias to berdiga

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updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by Brenda

11 Answers

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You guys are great!!

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by Brenda
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I had heard of Esperanto, took me awhile to find it, but in searching I found this, which I think is what Abel is referring to

Latino Sine Flexione (LSF)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latino_sine_Flexione

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by motley
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And the suspense builds (cue dramatic music) =)

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by manutd
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Is it Esperanto'

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by motley
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Sounds interesting!

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by Vesuvian-Ruin
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I stand corrected. It is bendiga.

And as soon as I can find it, I will share with all an expression that someone gave me last year, in a language that appears Latin based, but is not. I figure I can start here. I am told that it has immense ramifications for mankind, but noone can translate it. Really spooky stuff. I'll look for it tonight.

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by abel-arredondo2
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It must be "bendiga"

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by 00494d19
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Heidita, Thank you so much.

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by Brenda
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Abel, Thank you so very much.

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by Brenda
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It should read: Te amo. Cuidate mi nino, que Dios te vendiga.

Translated: I love you. Take care my son, may God bless you.

updated ENE 9, 2008
posted by abel-arredondo2
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TE amo, cuidate, mi niño, que Dios te bendiga.

I love you, take care, dear, may God be with you.

updated ENE 8, 2008
posted by 00494d19