Do native speakers regularly use "estadounidense" to refer to people from the United States?

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I have only seen "estadounidense" for the 1st time in a fairly new textbook dated 2008. I always learned "american@" or "norteamerican@" for someone from the USA. My daughter thinks it is neat because she says it makes more sense: Canadian, Mexican, United State -sian, but I would never call myself that. Comments?

20884 views
updated MAR 2, 2012
posted by ashepard

7 Answers

2
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Hm.. Do you want the truth, or the polite, PC answer? wink

updated ENE 28, 2012
posted by Gekkosan
The truth will set you free! If you have a different perspective, please share
Oh, the truth, please Gekkosan.... we can get PC anywhere, but from you we expect the unvarnished truth!!
I'm with rodneyp! :-D
The truth then: when we're talking about US Citizens (sometimes even to their face) we use "gringos". If I must be polite, then I'll say "estadounidense". I am one of those who thinks what all of us in the Americas are "Americanos".
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Cuando, por el contexto, sabemos que nos referimos a alguien de Estados Unidos, solemos decir "americanos" o "norteamericanos", pero cuando queremos especificar que se trata de alguien de ese país, sí usamos "estadounidense", igual que usaríamos "canadiense" para referirnos a alguien de Canadá.

updated ENE 26, 2012
posted by Cordobesa
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"Estadounidense" is the legal term for documents, etc. People in the countries of the Americas are more likely to use it because they too are Americans. In Spain, "Americano" would be more likely used just as most European countries will say "America" rather than "The United States" because they are not part of the Americas, hence, they don´t feel that their name is being stolen.

updated ENE 26, 2012
edited by 005faa61
posted by 005faa61
I think I'll just start telling people I'm "canadiense," especially since I would like to visit Cuba before I die!
That's perfect! And since you are from North Carolina, you could say "canadiese sureña" ja ja
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Estados Unidos- Estadounidense Canada- Canadiense America- Americano Peru- Peruano Chile- Chileno

These are some examples of what spanish speakers would call people from specific countries.

Technically the term 'Americano' or 'Norteamericano' can be applied to anyone living in the American continent or North America respectively.

That being said, I have never I heard any spanish speaking person use the word 'americano' or 'norteamericano' when they are referring from somebody from Mexico or Canada. Most spanish speaking people would use the term 'americano' or 'norteamericano' to refer to a person from the USA.

The word 'Estadounidense' is used as well, a little bit less though... not sure why, maybe it sounds a little too 'fancy' to some. However it definitely is the most technically correct of the three.

updated ENE 26, 2012
posted by wingged
Although I've been asked on numerous occasions if I am norteamericano then asked if I am canadiense right after that.
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Of course, it would happen to be one of the hardest words to learn as a beginner! It took me forever to be able to say where I am from!

Americans (and I am talking about the Americans all over the 2 continents that contain us all) differentiate between all the countries to say, "the United States Americans". You can't literally translate this but have to use the word that Spanish speakers use for US citizens.

updated ENE 26, 2012
posted by katydew
Jeje, it wasn't really difficult for me, but it is long, lol. I find it fun to say, but I wish I could just say "americana"
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I live in Spain and people here refer to me as the "americana."

updated MAR 2, 2012
posted by missy8888
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We use the world "Estadounidense" in a formal way because "United States of America" is "Estados Unidos de America" in spanish. So from here comes the word "estadounidense".

I´m from Mexico city.

updated ENE 28, 2012
posted by juanm_velazquez