HomeQ&AAugmentative Suffixes - azo

Augmentative Suffixes - azo

6
votes

Well I learnt something very interesting today, thanks to Maestro JC - did you know that the augmentative suffix -azo indicates a blow or a strike?

Suffixes

-Azo to indicate a blow or strike: The suffix -azo can be applied somewhat freely to nouns to indicate a blow or strike; coined words using this suffix are sometimes found in journalese. Words formed in this way are always masculine.

Examples: hachazo (blow or chop with an ax), martillazo (blow with a hammer), puñetazo (punch with a fist), cabezazo (head butt), codazo (jab with the elbow), plumazo (the stroke of a pen), huevazo (a blow from a thrown egg), misilazo (missile strike), sartenazo (a blow from a frying pan)

So what is meant by 'abrazo'? tongue wink

13032 views
updated Oct 31, 2011
posted by Kiwi-Girl
Maybe it came from the manly slap on the back type pseudo-hug :-) - afowen, Dec 24, 2010
That would be a palmada. - BellaMargarita, Dec 24, 2010
I think I just had one of those for lunch :-) - afowen, Dec 24, 2010
lol :) - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 24, 2010
@ Margaret, that could work, gracias :) - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 24, 2010

13 Answers

4
votes

"Abrazo" does not use the suffix -azo. It is the noun from the verb "abrazar", from "brazo". It is like

cantar -> un canto

abrazar -> un abrazo

While it can be used sometimes as an augmentative suffix (used with good or bad intentions), it is also used as a pejorative one, and both as augmentative and pejorative at the same time, often depending on the context and the intention of the speaker, as in "perrazo", which can be a huge dog, if you are commenting on the size, a dog you despise, if you are making bad comments about it, or both.

"Manaza" and "bocaza" are examples of pejorative references to parts of the body. Interestingly, this suffix it is very often used for big or great things in a positive way, as in "partidazo", "cuerpazo", "besazo" or "madraza".

It is also a very productive suffix for hits, strikes and sudden collisions or energetic encounters. The number of words in this group is quite large, and you can easily create your own words: arañazo, balazo, bastonazo, botellazo, cantazo, culatazo, escobazo, espaldarazo, estacazo, lametazo, martillazo, palazo, pelotazo, portazo, porrazo, puñetazo,... A thread on creating words like this could be quite funny and creative. An example: "Le dio un jamonazo al vehículo".

alt text

updated Oct 31, 2011
edited by lazarus1907
posted by lazarus1907
great idea Lazarus - I'll start it if you moderate it lol :) wouldn't be the first time je je - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 24, 2010
love the word and the picture btw :) - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 24, 2010
If people create new "-azo" strikes, it is something likely to be funny rather than being moderated, but I'll be happy to. - lazarus1907, Dec 24, 2010
yr a treasure, gracias :) - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 24, 2010
2
votes

cacerolazo - Banging on pots and pans as a form of protest. (Thanks KevinB)

updated Dec 25, 2010
posted by Sabor
awesome one! lol :) - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 25, 2010
2
votes

You might want to review this short article on -azo suffix.

This suffix is used in three ways:

1.Forming augmentatives; words expressing greatness or size

2.Forming pejoratives; words emphasizing contempt for a subject

3.Forming words expressing a hit or strike

The second category is interesting enough, but I don't want to quote examples here red face

updated Dec 25, 2010
edited by pesta
posted by pesta
thanx Pesta :) - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 24, 2010
1
vote

Pelo - hair : Pelazo - great luscious hair

updated Oct 31, 2011
posted by -Itza-
1
vote

Puerto Ricans have a number of very colorful expressions that are not found anywhere else in the Spanish-speaking world, as far as I know.

They use "guayazo" for example, to mean a scratch. In other places this might be called "un rayón. "

A man that was doing some work in our house let us know that he had received an electrical shock by telling us that: "el cable me dió un cantazo".

alt text

In other places, en electrical shock would be "un corrientazo."

updated Oct 31, 2011
posted by Gekkosan
1
vote

madraza - It's not quite the azo suffix, being naturally feminine, but it seems to fit this thread:

madraza

feminine noun

1.= indulgent or doting mother

augmentative

2.= A very fond mother. (f)

updated Jul 4, 2011
posted by pesta
1
vote

Interesting!

How about "pedazo," which means a piece of something. I wonder how that relates.

updated Dec 24, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
hmmm, good question, Julian? lol :) - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 24, 2010
A piece broken off could be the result of the stroke of a foot. - Sabor, Dec 24, 2010
"Pedazo" probably originated from "Pieza." Now if you want to create a play on words, "Pedazo" works well, but I´ll let your imagination figure this out - JulianChivi, Dec 24, 2010
1
vote

I found this great one:

flechazo - arrow shot / arrow wound, or figuratively "love at first sight"

Example: le ha dado el flechazo = he's smitten

updated Dec 24, 2010
posted by pesta
qué bueno! :) - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 24, 2010
1
vote

It could have that meaning orginally, but has come to simply a hug or embrace.

updated Dec 24, 2010
posted by BellaMargarita
1
vote

From your list of examples I will choose plumazo (the stroke of a pen).Thus abrazo must be the stroke of an arm.

updated Dec 24, 2010
posted by Sabor
Nice :) - Kiwi-Girl, Dec 24, 2010
But "brazo" IS an arm. The stroke of an arm must then be "brazoazo"... :) - pesta, Dec 24, 2010
Language sometimes contracts or reduces sound repetitions. - Sabor, Dec 24, 2010
1
vote

I choose portazo - slam of a door.

updated Dec 24, 2010
posted by pesta
I like it! - --Mariana--, Dec 24, 2010
0
votes

Bueno, me gusta mucho la lengua coloquial, entonces voy a poner este ejemplo: "Qué coñazo de este libro."

"What a boring book".

Creo que el origen de esta palabra es fácil de adivinar, ¿no?

updated Dec 25, 2010
posted by bomberapolaca
0
votes

Well it looks like Diego Torres agrees with Margaret, so palmada is winning so far smile La Flor Más Bella "Y una palmada se oyó el canto de una sirena"

updated Dec 24, 2010
posted by Kiwi-Girl
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.
SOCIAL NETWORKS
APPS