Words like "Malagueña", "guantanamera"

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I wonder if there are other words like these. As far as I know these words mean "the girl from Malaga, and the girl from guantanamo"
Are there mas'

3109 views
updated ABR 24, 2008
posted by Alper-ahan

10 Answers

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Todo depende del lugar. Suele ser muy parecido al lugar de la ciudad, pero hay otro que no tienen nada de similar.
En Canarias, por ejemplo, a alguien de Lanzarote puede llamársele tanto "lanzaroteño" como "conejero"; y a alguien de Fuerteventura se les llama "majoreros" ^^

updated ABR 24, 2008
posted by Rakel-Mesa
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Sorry, I wrong writing adjetive instead adjective too; En el "Diccionario de la Real Academia de la Lengua Española", la palabra aparece como Nipon, y se define como un adjetivo de alguien nativo de Japon; Relativo o proceddente de...
I just was traying to explain what means the spanish word GENTILICIO, which is in discussion.
Being repetitive, such adjective not always (just sometimes) derived from the NAME OF COUNTRY OR CITY of origin.
Aha, Thank you for explaining the nippon word's provenance; the forum is to share knowledge.

updated ABR 21, 2008
posted by Vernic
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Are you trying to say that a person from Japan is called a Nipon? If so, you are mistaken. The name "Japan" in Japanese is Nihon or Nippon (never Nipon), and a Japanese person is a nihonjin, which just means Japanese person.

I'm a Japanese translator.

updated ABR 21, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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In spanish is a GENTILICIO the adjetive that gives each person according to it's origin, which not always derived from the name of Country or City. So you can find a Nipon of Japan, a Crioca of Brazil or Chilango of Mexico City.

updated ABR 21, 2008
posted by Vernic
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I have these words for you: "Gaucho" is from Argentina is the name for mens who ride horses and work in the country with animals. I am not Argentin people, that why I am not going to explain more this word, because it is like all a genuine style of life for that people, that I respect too much, and I do not want to make any mistake talking about that, it is better if you read something about them in internet. It is quite interesting.
From Mexico, the word it is "Charros".
In Venezuela "Llaneros"

Rebeca

updated ABR 19, 2008
posted by scarlet
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Y los costarricenses se llaman ticos, y los que vienen de Guadalajara son tapatíos. Para dar dos ejemplos más. Y nosotros que vivimos en San Francisco ¿somos sanpancheros? (jajaja!)

BTW, the movie "Yo Soy Boricua, Pa' Que Tu Lo Sepas" is a very good look into "los nuevayorquinos" and other puertorriqueños living in the US. (Well, Puerto Rico IS in the US, but you know what I mean.)

updated ABR 18, 2008
posted by 00bacfba
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No, there isn't really a rule. As for people from Madrid, you could use the words mentioned by SPL2008, but often it is just easier to say something like this:
Ella es de Madrid.
rather than
Ella en un madrileño/madrideño.

updated ABR 15, 2008
posted by manutd
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Hi Alper,
Puertorican people also call themselves "boricua", men as well as women. And when referring to a Venezuelan man, "chavo" is somethimes used. It means something like "bloke" or "dude". A man from Curacao is called a "Curacoleño" (not sure about the spelling though).

updated ABR 14, 2008
posted by chicasabrosa
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actually i am looking for what they use for people from madrid smile
and how we make one from a name of a region. I mean is there some kind of a rule for it'

updated ABR 13, 2008
posted by Alper-ahan
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Hey Alper,
En dondequiera mirar hay palabras como estas. Yo tengo amiga de Puerto Rica, entonces ella es puertoriqueña. Es mero adjectivo. Entendiste'

updated ABR 12, 2008
posted by Jerry-Kern