What does "No dar papaya" mean.

3
votes

As an idiom, I think it means not to put yourself into a dangerous situation, but I am not sure. I would like some guidance from native speakers. Thanks in advance.

39119 views
updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by sanlee

10 Answers

7
votes

It's a Colombian expression which colloquially it means:

Don’t get caught sleeping ......or

Don’t put yourself in a position where you become vulnerable to be taken advantage of.

updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by JorgeViento
¡Muchas gracias!
5
votes

With spanish you have to understand that a certain phrase could mean different things depending on which country, or even which region of a country you are.

"Dar papaya" in Colombia in general (I'm pretty sure this phrase is Colombian, but other's might correct me if I'm wrong) means "Putting yourself in a position where someone can take advantage of you"

For example: You were sitting in a restaurant, left your bag unattended and someone took it from you, because your weren't paying attention

It can also be used for other situations like for instance when a co worker doesn't like you, and you say or do something that compromises you, he sees that and turns you in.

I'm Colombian, by the way smile

updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by Kam99
That is how my Colombian friend explained it to me (more so with not putting yourself in a position to be robbed).
¡Muchas gracias!
3
votes

I would translate it as: don´t get caught with your pants down.

updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by mediterrunio
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3
votes

Hi, if it was translated literally it would mean don't give 'fruit/papaya' but it basically means don't put yourself into situations where you are more likly to be taken advantage of but what you said generally means the same also. Hope I helped you on this one smile

updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by globos-rojos
¡Muchas gracias!
3
votes

I will mention that I am NOT a native speaker so you can wait for confirmation from one and discount my response! I do happen to know that 'dar papaya' is like a provocation, something stupid or without thought - an English equivalent would be 'asking for it'. Dejar su coche en la calle es como dar papaya a la gentuza.

updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by margaretbl
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3
votes

no it doesn't change according to anything. It's very simple, no dar papaya means "don't be stupid and dont put yourself in a vulnerable situation when others could take advantage of you!!! " no de papaya!!!

updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by pcp2104
Yes, all the answers seem to agree.
¡Muchas gracias!
2
votes

"Dar papaya" in Colombia in general (I'm pretty sure this phrase is Colombian, but other's might correct me if I'm wrong) means "Putting yourself in a position where someone can take advantage of you"

I heard this expression from a Colombian, but I have no idea if it's used anywhere else. To my knowledge it is largely a Colombian expression.

Echanse un vistazo a este link:

Dar Papaya

updated Jul 24, 2013
edited by rodneyp
posted by rodneyp
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2
votes

In my native language means "don't give any one a hard time" smile smile

updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by ceci1821
Welcome to the forum, cecil!
Ought we assume that your native languages is Spanish? (your profile gives no indication)
¡Muchas gracias!
2
votes

Don't give a precious gift to the robbers .. papaya is a valued fruit ... don't leave it lying around. In practice don't flash your expensive phone or watch around because you will be inviting robbers to gratefully relieve you of it.

updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by NickDun
Hi and welcome to the forum! Thank you, NickDun!
¡Muchas gracias!
1
vote

Thanks for your answers. I am still not sure I understand it. This phrase seems to change according to its locality. And it seems to have a broad meaning.

updated Jul 24, 2013
posted by sanlee
Why don´t you try giving us the context where you´ve found the phrase? That´s usually the key to get the best answer.
This was a phrase book entry and I was trying to figure it out. Thanks
¡Muchas gracias!
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