HomeQ&AEgoista vs. Envidiosa

Egoista vs. Envidiosa

1
vote

Last night my daughter's cousin came over to play. It was the first time the two have met each other. (Big family).

On her way out, her mother asked her if she had a good time.

"Sí Mamá. Tiene muchos jugetes y me deja jugar con todo! No es envidiosa para nada."

I asked my wife about this, because I would have thought the word to use there would have been egoista. Her response was that although envidiosa translates to "jealous"or "envious", here in Mexico it is used to mean "selfish" as well sometimes.

I would be interested to hear other native speakers' thoughts on this subject. I checked the translation of envidiosa and this was not one of the translations listed.

3876 views
updated JUL 16, 2010
posted by petersenkid2
I fogot to add that my wife is a native Spanish speaker - and a Spanish teacher for the past 15 years. - petersenkid2, JUL 16, 2010
Lucky you, Petersen! - --Mariana--, JUL 16, 2010

4 Answers

3
votes

"Egoista" and "envidiosa" are two different words. Not synonymous at all. As you said, "egoista" (selfish) is the correct word for that situation.

updated JUL 16, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
I completely agree, but native speakers here in Mexico use "envidosa". - petersenkid2, JUL 16, 2010
2
votes

Not here in Spain, two different words, peterwink

updated JUL 16, 2010
posted by 00494d19
It's difficult at times to learn a language when the native speakers sometimes (frequently) use it incorrectly! - petersenkid2, JUL 16, 2010
1
vote

Her response was that although envidiosa translates to "jealous"or "envious", here in Mexico it is used to mean "selfish" as well sometimes.

That is not correct. I have never heard the use of "envidia" replacing "egoísmo".

"Envidia" is what you feel when someone has something that you don't have: a big house, a fancy car, a great job, health, money, beauty, etc. and you want to have it too, but you can't for some reason.

"Egoísmo" is when you do not want to share something you have/own with someone else because you think you will lose it or you do not want to share your joy of having/using it with them.

They are not using the words correctly.

I found these two interesting posts: link link2

The child that does not have the toy is envious or jealous of the child that does have the toy. Therefore, to say that the child is not selfish would be the same as saying that the child is not jealous or envious when he does not have the toy.

I can see your point here, nevertheless, "egoísta" is the correct word because the child the toy belongs to does not want/like to share it.

updated JUL 16, 2010
edited by Mokay
posted by Mokay
Excellent articles in the links. Thanks! - petersenkid2, JUL 16, 2010
1
vote

Though they might not be synonyms, I could see how envious or jealous could fit into the context similar to selfish.

The child that does not have the toy is envious or jealous of the child that does have the toy. Therefore, to say that the child is not selfish would be the same as saying that the child is not jealous or envious when he does not have the toy.

I could support his wife's response without saying that the words are synonyms.

updated JUL 16, 2010
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
Yes, but it's the one that does have the toy that is being described as "not envidiosa". :-) I see this as a case of native speakers using the wrong word, don't you? - petersenkid2, JUL 16, 2010
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