HomeQ&Athe use of the expression "not quite"

the use of the expression "not quite"

2
votes

I am not sure about how to use the expression "not quite", meaning "just under" or "nearly".

For example, would these sentences be correct?

There are not quite twenty apples in the basket. We spent not quite two hours cleaning the house. We didn't spend quite two hours cleaning the house.

Thank you very much for your help.

2614 views
updated JUL 15, 2010
posted by esuarezg

3 Answers

3
votes

Hi there,

Although your sentences might be gramatically correct, I don't think it is common to use "quite" as you have in your examples. I don't exactly know the grammatical rule but Marianne has listed some examples that are very commonly used.

In your examples, I would suggest that these phrases would be more likely to be used:

  • There are just under/almost twenty apples in the basket.
  • We spent just under/almost/less than two hours cleaning the house.
  • We didn't spend all of two hours cleaning the house.

Hope this helps!

Saludos, Chica

updated JUL 18, 2010
posted by chicasabrosa
I agree that his sentences sound akward. - --Mariana--, JUL 14, 2010
Thank you everyone for your help. I was having trouble with this expression. - esuarezg, JUL 14, 2010
You're welcome :) - chicasabrosa, JUL 15, 2010
3
votes

Hello and welcome to the SpanishDict forum!

Some other examples of the word "quite."

1) Are we there yet? No, not quite.

2) How much milk do we have? Quite enough.

3) The grandmother drove quite slowly down the street.

4) Your report is not quite accurate.

5) My headache is quite painful.

updated JUL 18, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
1
vote

Very well done! smile

updated JUL 18, 2010
posted by Delores--Lindsey
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