HomeQ&ATrabajan en (los)...

Trabajan en (los)...

1
vote

Hola a todos:

Por favor, alguien me podría decir ¿cuál es la diferencia entre las siguientes frases?

• Los médicos trabajan en los hospitales.

• Los médicos trabajan en hospitales.

Con referencia al sentido de las frases ¿hay una diferencia entre las dos?

Gracias a todos de antemano

4521 views
updated JUL 13, 2010
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
Better question. Where did the term hospital come from? I don't find the hospitable. - 0074b507, JUL 13, 2010

4 Answers

1
vote

Here's my take on the subject:

Here is a link to an article explaining what I think is an English viewpoint that rockdown suggested:

The cookies refers to specific cookies

cookies (no def. art.) refers to cookies in general

Here is what I consider the Spanish viewpoint:

With abstract nouns and nouns used in a general sense: In English, the article is often omitted with abstract nouns and nouns that refer more to a concept than a tangible item. But it still is needed in Spanish. A few examples might help clarify: La ciencia es importante. (Science is important.) Creo en la justicia. (I believe in justice.) Estudio la literatura. (I study literature.) La primavera es bella. (Spring is beautiful.)

In Spanish, the general usage employs the definite article as well as the specific usage. (las galletas) refer to the cookies in general or specific cookies.

That being said, there is the rule that modified nouns usually take articles, while unmodified nouns don't.

Tírame la pelota roja

Throw me the red ball. (specific ball)

Tírame pelota.

Throw me a (any) ball.

These usages seem to contradict each other.

So I just continue on confused as I do with almost all Spanish grammar rules that seem to have exceptions and contradictions.

With abstract nouns and nouns used in a general sense: In English, the article is often omitted with abstract nouns and nouns that refer more to a concept than a tangible item. But it still is needed in Spanish. A few examples might help clarify: La ciencia es importante. (Science is important.) Creo en la justicia. (I believe in justice.) Estudio la literatura. (I study literature.) La primavera es bella. (Spring is beautiful.)

updated JUL 13, 2010
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
Thanks Q...I think that you have summarized nicely my own confusion regarding this topic - Izanoni1, JUL 13, 2010
And confused me somewhat :) - ian-hill, JUL 13, 2010
0
votes

The difference here is that with the LOS before hospitales, you are indicating a specific set of hospitals, while without the LOS, you are just saying that doctors work in hospitals. Basically it's the difference between:

The doctors work in the hospitals.

The doctors work in hospitals.

It's hard to see the difference, but it's mainly when you look at the question asked. If someone asks, "Do doctors work in hospitals?" you would use the 2nd one. If someone asks, "Where do the doctors work?" you would use the first. This is a very abstract theme, but I like that you are so curious. =p

updated JUL 13, 2010
posted by rockdown667
0
votes

Hi Iza

Maybe just the same as the difference in English.

updated JUL 13, 2010
posted by ian-hill
I don't know....What is confusing me is that I know that in Spanish often when speaking about a particular class of things, the definite article is often not translated to English (i.e. Los hospitales ▬► hospitals) - Izanoni1, JUL 13, 2010
That's your answer! Sometimes an article is used in Spanish because, "That's the way it is." I wouldn't lose sleep over this. Just accept it. The more you use these idiosyncracies, the more they will become natural for you. - - 005faa61, JUL 13, 2010
One of the biggest stumbling blocks of language learning is language comparison - 005faa61, JUL 13, 2010
0
votes

I'm waiting for someone who knows (remembers) their grammar to say that you need the article in this case. Something about if you make a general statement it needs the article and also for locations like a school, univ, work, etc. confused

updated JUL 13, 2010
posted by margaretbl
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