HomeQ&A"Mamaste" = Sucked?

"Mamaste" = Sucked?

4
votes

I just beat a guy in online poker (I play in the spanish "casinos" on facebook) and after I had obliterated the guy another person told him "mamaste". Does this translate to "you sucked"?

-sorry if this is vulgar-

14443 views
updated JUL 14, 2010
posted by indysidnarayan

12 Answers

5
votes

It is vulgar language. It used to say that you got beaten, or that somebody got you. Never say it to a woman though. I can't explain it more clearly. I'm sorry.

updated JUL 13, 2010
posted by 00e657d4
jeje... how horrible. - NikkiLR, JUL 12, 2010
Not cool!! Thanks for the information!! - Jason7R, JUL 12, 2010
This answer seriously made me laugh out loud. I get where you're going, thanks for the info :) - indysidnarayan, JUL 13, 2010
3
votes

This word has many variations of meaning:

Mamón ........... Pacifier or Bull$hitter or person with childish behavour

"No mames" ¨Don´t bull$hit me"

Mamada ......... Completely worthless

Mamar ...... To suck

And as Guillermo said, its slang usage is very low.

updated JUL 14, 2010
posted by 005faa61
3
votes

Yeah Marianne, all I was getting was from the verb mamar which means to suckle and it's in the past tense so I would have to agree with you that it's simply you suck or your terrible. smile By the way I also saw that used like this, "lo mamó desde pequeño" means, "he/she was immersed in it as a child" (from my dictionary). wink

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by Jason7R
2
votes

I don't understand why this is difficult. Am I missing something?

Mamaste means "you sucked". ¿¿Doesn't it?? Why is it in doubt?

updated JUL 14, 2010
posted by Goyo
Because it is in reference to Poker. See my answer below. It seems that none of the people on this board are poker players. - petersenkid2, JUL 14, 2010
2
votes

I know what you're trying to say.

I can't find much online. All it talks about is the preterit version, etc. Not much help.

Even in my Urban Dictionary it uses it like a verb, but it's not like "You were awful/you sucked/you stunk at this game."

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
1
vote

In poker terms - a suck-out.

Suck out - To come from behind to win a hand.

If you are behind on a hand, and you catch a card or combination of cards that cause you to win the pot, you have sucked out. Sucking out simply means that you have come from behind to win the hand. This often upsets the player who was in the lead, who may feel that you did not have the correct pot odds to take the draw, or that you got very lucky to win the pot. They may try to belittle your play, or they may make a sarcastic comment like “Nice suck out.” You shouldn’t take this personally, just as they shouldn’t take getting sucked out on personally. It’s all part of the game.

Or - in Spanish - mamaste.

A poker website explaining a suckout in more detail

updated JUL 16, 2010
edited by petersenkid2
posted by petersenkid2
1
vote

I think "mamarse a alguien" in Central American countries can mean "matar" - to do someone in, to murder somebody. Which we use as regards to beating somebody by a great margin, ie, I murdered you at tennis. In other words, you were useless.

updated JUL 12, 2010
edited by Eddy
posted by Eddy
that was the kind of thing I was wondering about - nizhoni1, JUL 12, 2010
0
votes

Okay, clearly the person you beat was either Mexican or of Mexican descent, lol. I love it.

We use that word for millions of things. Yes, it is vulgar language and I don't advise to use this word freely or with someone you just met.The beauty of curse words in Mexico is that a curse words, even though they are insults, can be used to praise, to assure friendship, or in other words: something that it is meant to be nice and fuzzy. : )

The verb on itself means: "to suck", but, it this case... the word per-sé has lost that meaning, so I would not suggest to relate the literal meaning of the word to what it really means. (Although we can, but it would be tracing idom over idiom over idiom and it would be very troublesome)

In this case, there is no exact meaning to the idiom or slang. You can use "(ya) mamaste" either to say "HA! Take that, I just beat you!!" or to say "mamaste" like "Oh cr*p, you're a very good player."

Edit: even though it is a curse word, he did not mean any offense, I can practically assure you that.

updated JUL 14, 2010
edited by MadderSky
posted by MadderSky
0
votes

Hola,

En Colombia también se usa para decir "put up with"...

"Me tocó mamarme a mi suegra." = "I had to put up with my mother-in-law."

Hope this helps.

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by LuisaGomezBartle
Don't go to Guatemala and say that. - viajero, JUL 12, 2010
They liable to wash your oral cavity with soap- real cheap soap, the one they call ""jabon de coche ( pig's soap)" - viajero, JUL 12, 2010
Gracias por el consejo ;) - LuisaGomezBartle, JUL 12, 2010
Algo curioso: también se le dice inmamable a aquel que es insoportable. - LuisaGomezBartle, JUL 12, 2010
0
votes

Interesting about the different meaning in a slang sort of way. "Mamar" is "to nurse a child" or "to give breast to a child". Obviously there are accepted slang meanings in different regions. Unless a person is a native speaker, it might be a good rule of thumb to not throw the word around casually. Things having to do with "milk" and the like can have double meaning, and it can be unintentionally embarrassing, especially for a female listener. For example, in the US a person might go into a store an ask an employee "Do you have milk here?", but in Mexico you wouldn't want to ask a female employee "¿Tiene(s) leche?"

Once again, I am making this suggestion in a general sort of way; if everyone in Colombia uses "mamarse" meaning "to put up with", then - go for it!

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by mountaingirl123
0
votes

Could this be equivalent to "You got owned"?

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by Deanski
yes, thats right. - viajero, JUL 12, 2010
0
votes

What about the definition in this dictionary "to get plastered". I usually relate that to alcohol but maybe it means just "destroyed or smashed" or wasted, along those lines.

updated JUL 12, 2010
posted by nizhoni1
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