HomeQ&AHelp understanding the verb 'meter'

Help understanding the verb 'meter'

1
vote

Confronting his 'ex' amante as to why she was sleeping with his best friend, he glibly comments te fuiste a meter con mi mejor amigo

I know what they were doing, I just don't know how to fit meter into the equation.

From the dictionary here, this is the only definition that came close, To be on terms of familiarity with a person

So, why is meter in the infinitive? Since you went - ----- with my best friend (as close as I can understand in English), surely I wouldn't say you went to put with my best friend. Is meter in this sense an idiomatic saying? Thanks for your help.

3293 views
updated JUL 9, 2010
posted by Jack-OBrien

3 Answers

0
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te fuiste a meter is the ir+a+verb infinitive periphrasis used for future tense (in the past in this case). You were going to involve yourself...

Umm, it completely slipped my mind that ir+a+verb infinitive works in a past tense. That certainly clears that part up. So, in this case wouldn't it be "You went and involved yourself with my best friend"? Thanks very much!

updated JUL 9, 2010
posted by Jack-OBrien
iba a hablar=I was going to talk fui a hablar= I was going to talk fuiste a hablar=you were going to talk... always to be in correct tense+ going to+verb - 0074b507, JUL 9, 2010
0
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So, why is meter in the infinitive?

The reason that meter is an infinitive is because te fuiste a meter is the ir+a+verb infinitive periphrasis used for future tense (in the past in this case). You were going to involve yourself...

As to the translation of meter I think it is similar to meterse en un lío, (get into or be involved in a mess or jam) , but I'll leave that explanation to a native.

meter

  • (hacer participar)

  • meter a alguien en algo -> to get somebody into something

  • ¡en buen lío nos has metido! -> this is a fine mess you've gotten us into!
updated JUL 9, 2010
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
I read every definition of meter I could find, I just couldn't seem to fit one of them properly in this sentence. I probably need some sleep :~( - Jack-OBrien, JUL 9, 2010
0
votes

My attempt: Meter in this context means "to mess with"

updated JUL 9, 2010
posted by Sheily
Is that an idiom? or is that a 'regular' definition? Thanks!! - Jack-OBrien, JUL 9, 2010
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