HomeQ&AAre all objects fixed in gender?

Are all objects fixed in gender?

0
votes

For example, are ALL potatos feminine? Or, is it possible to change "papa" into a masculine form?

1412 views
updated JUL 9, 2010
posted by michelleng

3 Answers

3
votes

Grammatical gender has little to do with natural gender (male/female). In the case of people and some (usually domesticated) animals, they coincide but for the most part, there is no logic to grammatical gender. In many cases a word is masculine/feminine because it had that gender in Latin. Of course that may prompt the question "Well why was it masculine/feminine in Latin?" Grammatical gender has more to do with the way a word sounds than with the meaning of the word.

updated JUL 11, 2010
posted by samdie
1
vote

Like socceryo3 said, nouns have fixed gender. But there are some cases, like policía, where it can be a bit confusing out of context. La policía can mean the police force, and it is femenine. La policía can also mean a police woman, which is obviously also femenine. But el policía means policeman, masculine. But they don't change. You can't have masculine potatoes.

updated JUL 11, 2010
edited by KevinB
posted by KevinB
1
vote

Find me a male potato. Hahaha.

But in all seriousness, yes they all have a gender. It's not any kind of exact science at all, and it doesn't mean the object IS a girl or a boy. La persona, the person, can be a man or a woman. You can refer to a guy as una persona. Doesn't mean he's a girl or that you're calling him that.

updated JUL 9, 2010
posted by socceryo3
How about a King Edward? Desiree would be his female friend. - fontanero, JUL 9, 2010
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