HomeQ&ASo sleeeeepy....

So sleeeeepy....

10
votes

I am fascinated to see that there are two very common Spanish words that are related to sleep, and that for some reason do not appear to have an easy translation into English. They have been used in recent threads: "trasnochar'' and ''desvelar''.

I am curious to see how native English speakers would express the following concept:

Ando todo trasnochado. Me desvelé con el ruido de la celebración de los españoles.

Right this moment, I can't think of a short way of saying it.

5253 views
updated NOV 13, 2011
posted by Gekkosan
This question makes me think too much!!! This is so difficult to translate! >:( - MeEncantanCarasSonrisas, JUL 8, 2010
:-) - Gekkosan, JUL 8, 2010

20 Answers

3
votes

We would say I was up all night. The noise from the Spainards´ celebration kept me awake.

updated JUL 9, 2010
posted by BellaMargarita
transnochar to stay up all night desvelar to keep awake There are no one word equvialent for these concepts. - BellaMargarita, JUL 8, 2010
Right. That's what I figure... I was hoping I could add a new word or two to my vocabulary. :-) - Gekkosan, JUL 8, 2010
As far as I can tell, no matter how we look at it, this is the final conclusion. See my post marked "Conclusion", below. - Gekkosan, JUL 9, 2010
3
votes

Tired, fatigued, beat, exhausted can refer to both lack of sleep or from over exertion, but we have words that pertain to each specific context.

Drained, spent is usually used from over exertion (mental or physical) and drowse, drowsy only pertains to lack of sleep. (being sleepy from the effects of drugs, medication, etc.)

updated JUL 9, 2010
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
Hm! ''Drowsy"is a good one! How about Ï'm all drowsy from being kept up all night by the noise from the celebration''? - Gekkosan, JUL 8, 2010
sounds good to me Gekko - nizhoni1, JUL 8, 2010
Well, I understand it. - 0074b507, JUL 8, 2010
3
votes

I'm knackered The Spaniards party kept me up all night.

for "knackered" you could substitute "exhausted" "tired out"

Maybe all that's needed is "I was up all night thanks to the Spaniards' party" but that doesn't answer the question properly

updated JUL 9, 2010
edited by lagartijaverde
posted by lagartijaverde
Haha - I like that one! - margaretbl, JUL 8, 2010
Yeah, I thought of 'knackered', because some of my English buddies used to employ it in the context of having had a rough night. But it can also refer to any sort of exhaustion. - Gekkosan, JUL 8, 2010
Now this gave me another idea: Ï'm all drowsy. I had a rough night with the noise from the Spaniard's celebration" - Gekkosan, JUL 8, 2010
who says that G? - may'be in the bodice buster days lol - woe is me, I'm all drowsy jeje - Kiwi-Girl, JUL 8, 2010
What! Are you calling me an Old Lizard!? Why, you snotty whipper-snapper, I ought to teach you some manners! ;-) - Gekkosan, JUL 8, 2010
There's another side to "knackered" as well which is "worn out" not in the sense of sleep/exhaustion but in the sense of beyond repair. "These ols shoues are so knackered that I have to throw them away". - lagartijaverde, JUL 8, 2010
I'm pretty sure it's a horsey term, when an old horse (not talking about u G lol) get's past it, worn out, it would get sent off the to knackers yard :) - Kiwi-Girl, JUL 8, 2010
Ouch! - Gekkosan, JUL 8, 2010
3
votes

How about 'haggard'? (edit or run down) for trasnochado smile

Desvelar on the other hand has quite a variety of meanings apparently:

Desvelar a vt 1 (=quitar el sueño) to keep awake

el café me desvela coffee keeps me awake or stops me from getting to sleep

2 (=descubrir) [+algo oculto] to reveal, unveil [+misterio] to solve, explain b desvelarse vpr

1 (=no poder dormir) to be unable to get to sleep

2 (=vigilar) to be watchful, keep one's eyes open

desvelarse por algo to take great care over sth se desvela porque no nos falte de nada she works hard so that we should not go short of anything desvelarse por hacer algo to do everything possible to do sth

updated JUL 9, 2010
edited by Kiwi-Girl
posted by Kiwi-Girl
Ah! And a smart-alec to boot, huh? Heh - heh, you're my kind of gal! This is good! - Gekkosan, JUL 8, 2010
I liked the combination of keep awake (ie. having your eyelids peeled back) and unveiling - my warped mind probably but I liked it. - Kiwi-Girl, JUL 8, 2010
And if we really want to get off-target we could bring 'outdated' into play with trasnochado :p - Kiwi-Girl, JUL 8, 2010
2
votes

Ando todo trasnochado. Me desvelé con el ruido de la celebración de los españoles.

This is how I would translate it:

= I am shattered from staying up all night .I was kept awake by the noise of the Spaniards' Celebration

Sorry, that was not particularly brief/concise I was more concerned with accuracy

updated JUL 9, 2010
edited by FELIZ77
posted by FELIZ77
2
votes

Wow! "Andar" has a lot of meanings when used with other words, so I'm just going to ignore the "to walk/travel" definition and give this a shot.

I was up all night. The Spaniards' celebration kept me awake.

(I didn't translate it as "I was kept up all night by the Spaniards' celebration" because it didn't seem so "natural" (or at least I wouldn't word it that way))

updated JUL 9, 2010
posted by MeEncantanCarasSonrisas
2
votes

"insomniac" is a great loose translation to "trasnochado". Look it up in a few dictionaries...it pretty much means "in a state of wakefulness by circumstances beyond your control".

updated JUL 9, 2010
edited by renaerules
posted by renaerules
reading the definition in this dictionary ,trasnochado gave me more of an impression of watching and waiting,m like with an ill child - nizhoni1, JUL 8, 2010
insomnia rings of a wretched wakefulness no matter what is happening, purposeless with a struggle for sleep - nizhoni1, JUL 8, 2010
Right Nizhoni . Trasnochado simply means you didn't get much sleep, for whatever reason. Imsomniac means you are *unable* to fall asleep, which is not always the case with trasnochado. - Gekkosan, JUL 9, 2010
2
votes

Ando todo trasnochado. Me desvelé con el ruido de la celebración de los españoles.

Here are a few quick and rough translations:

• I am all tuckered out. I didn't get a wink of sleep with all the racket coming from the Spaniard's celebration. (must have been a good game)

• I am in desperate need of sleep. I couldn't get any sleep with the noise coming from the Spaniard's celebration.

• I am feeling the (after)effects of my forced vigil last night. I was kept up by the Spaniard's celebration.

updated JUL 9, 2010
posted by Izanoni1
2
votes

Ando todo trasnochado:

Another English expression that has a similar sentiment is:

  • I am the walking dead / half dead
  • I am a zombie
updated JUL 9, 2010
posted by AndyHenry
2
votes

Trasnochar = to be up all night. Andar + present progressive = to be continuously doing something.

Therefore, "I was up all night."

Desvelar = to keep awake/prevent from sleeping. Desvelarse = to not be able to sleep, like you're keeping yourself from sleeping because you're focusing on something I guess

Therefore, "I couldn't sleep with the noise of the Spaniards' celebration."

updated JUL 9, 2010
edited by socceryo3
posted by socceryo3
u an isomniac? - juvia, JUL 9, 2010
2
votes

I'm beat. The Spaniards' party kept me up all night.

updated JUL 8, 2010
posted by petersenkid2
This isnice and short. Nevertheless, "beat" can be used to mean any sort of "really tired", right? Whereas "trasnochado" is a state that only applies to lack of sleep.... - Gekkosan, JUL 8, 2010
True. I was going for the "short". I am a native English speaker, and I don't think we differentiate between kinds of tired (no sleep vs. lots of work). - petersenkid2, JUL 8, 2010
1
vote

Okay, I am not a native but I have found the phrase "bright-eyed and bushy-tailed'. For example:

Jill: Hi, Jane! How are you on this beautiful morning? Jane: Bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, just as you might expect, since I've only had three hours of sleep. Despite the early hour, Dennis was bright-eyed and bushy-tailed.

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bright-eyed+and+bushy-tailed

However, I am not sure whether it is a good equivalent to 'desvelado' and 'trasnochado' in Spanish.

updated NOV 13, 2011
posted by bomberapolaca
But in this case "bright-eyed and bushy-tailed" is being used sarcastically, since it actually means completely the opposite. - Gekkosan, NOV 13, 2011
Well, you're right. Sarcasm and irony are necessary for the words to mean the same as 'trasnochado'. But, according to this dictionary, it is often used ironically, which obviously does not exlude its opposite meanig, though. True. :( - bomberapolaca, NOV 13, 2011
1
vote

jejejeje... I opened this up thinking it was a rant/poem/complaint/article about how sleepy someone was. I wanted to add about how little sleep I get.... :D

Ooh well, I'll save my complaints for my mom...

updated NOV 13, 2011
posted by Saythatagain
1
vote

Well I hate to let everyone down, no pressure aye guys lol. smile

I'm not sure that this exactly hits it on the head but if you had to use only one word, how about?

desvelar: sleepless

if you don't mind a couple of words then there's

suffered sleep deprivation :p

but truthfully I don't think anyone would say either of those naturally, 'kept up' or 'kept awake' (all night) would probably be my choice.

updated JUL 9, 2010
edited by Kiwi-Girl
posted by Kiwi-Girl
Hm.. I think that's fairly close. Not quite exactly the same concept, but maybe as close as we'll get: I'm all drowsy after having spend a sleepless night thanks to celebrating Spaniards.... - Gekkosan, JUL 9, 2010
or "Spent a wakeful night" - Izanoni1, JUL 9, 2010
And just to throw the cat amongst the pigeons - Juan desvela a sus padres, John gets on his parents' nerves. - Kiwi-Girl, JUL 9, 2010
1
vote

¿Que tal? "pasé la noche en blanco." debido del ruido de la celebración.

I had a sleepless night due to the noise of the celebration.

updated JUL 9, 2010
edited by 002262dd
posted by 002262dd
Well, yes... but we're trying to find exactly equivalent words in English. :-) - Gekkosan, JUL 9, 2010
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