HomeQ&A"car-loss" or "kad-loss"

"car-loss" or "kad-loss"

1
vote

My fellow spanish lovers

This should be simply but yet... How is the name "Carlos" pronounced 100% correctly ?

My new tutor insists the "r" is really a "d" sound in this one so "Kad-loss" is the way to go. I found that acceptable just like "salud" often sounds more like "saluth". Unfortunately, I can't find any natives (Spain or Latino) who want to agree with that. They all say "No way ! Its just "car-loss"

Help ?

2327 views
updated JUL 7, 2010
posted by stucky101

6 Answers

1
vote

Although you will get some regional differences here's a couple of audio links smile

Carlos

now this one has more of the 'd' sound going on: Carlos2

and these threads might help with the b/v issue: B/V Pronunciation Pronunciation B vs V

updated JUL 7, 2010
edited by Kiwi-Girl
posted by Kiwi-Girl
Wow, that second one is certainly an English speaking American from the United States. - KevinB, JUL 7, 2010
You're right it was pretty horrible wasn't it lol, I've replaced it with a better one now :) - Kiwi-Girl, JUL 7, 2010
Brilliant! It's much more careful than you'd hear in real life, but very proper. - KevinB, JUL 7, 2010
0
votes

TheSilentHer

So you're onboard with "Kadd-loss" then ?

updated JUL 7, 2010
posted by stucky101
0
votes

Maria

That second one could almost be a "d" since the "r" is not rolled at all. I always thought only "rr" is rolled unless a single "r" is at the beginning.

Then again if this is an english speaker then we might not have a good reference and it does sound quite American to me.

updated JUL 7, 2010
posted by stucky101
It's a matter of degree. All "r"s are rolled to some extent. Initial and double "r"s more so. It's the slight roll on the single "r" that makes English speaking ears think it's a "d". There really is a difference. - KevinB, JUL 7, 2010
0
votes

It's like the "d" sound when you say"caddy", or "butter".

updated JUL 7, 2010
posted by TheSilentHero
0
votes

well honestly saying "kad-loss" and "car-loss" does sound very similar to my ear. Just as long as the "d" is soft and not "kadh-loss". Maybe this is just a trick for English speakers. But there is no pronounciation rule anyone is aware of like with "v" and "b" right ?

updated JUL 7, 2010
posted by stucky101
There is a bit of a rule - a single "r" in the middle of a word is rolled a little bit. At the beginning of a word it's rolled more. Double "rr" is also rolled more. It's a matter of degree. - KevinB, JUL 7, 2010
0
votes

The "r" is rolled, but since it's a single "r" there's only a little rolling (I think of it as "1 roll"). It's not an English "d" sound, though someone with a not-great ear might think so. I'd say if your "r" rolling isn't great, just go with the English "r" sound. It will be understood.

Edit: My try at describing how to do a "short roll" - Say the Engliish "r" sound, but let the tip of your tongue barely touch the roof of your mouth at the end of the sound.

updated JUL 7, 2010
edited by KevinB
posted by KevinB
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