HomeQ&Aajeno = strange in dictionary, but why?

ajeno = strange in dictionary, but why?

4
votes

In reading the NVI version of the Bible, in Ephesians 2:12, the adjective "ajenos" is used. I didn't know this word, so I clicked into the dictionary here and I get the definitions as given below. The first and primary definition is "strange", yet there is not one example given that means "strange" to me. In every usage example I can find, it usually means "without" or "lacking" or something similar. Why would the primary definition be given as "strange"? If you look up "strange" in the English dictionary, there is no mention of "ajeno". In the context of Ephesians 2:12, it means "without", so I'm just wondering, why is the meaning given as "strange" in the dictionary? Thank you.

ajeno, -a adjective 1. of others (de otro)

* jugar en campo ajeno, -a -> to play away from home 
  1. (no relacionado)

    • es un problema ajeno, -a a la sociedad de hoy -> it's a problem that no longer exists in today's society
    • esto es ajeno, -a a nuestro departamento -> our department doesn't deal with that
    • por causas ajenas a nuestra voluntad -> for reasons beyond our control
  2. (no enterado, indiferente)

    • era ajena a lo que estaba ocurriendo -> she had no knowledge of what was happening

Copyright © 2006 Chambers Harrap Publishers Limited

ajeno [ah-hay-no, nah] adjective 1. Another’s. 2. Foreign, strange. 3. Abhorrent, contrary to, remote. 4. Ignorant. 5. Improper. (Metaphorical)

* Ajeno de verdad -> void of truth
* Estar ajeno de sí -> to be unselfish, without self-love
* Estar ajeno de una cosa -> not to have heard a rumor
4216 views
updated JUL 6, 2010
posted by Jack-OBrien

6 Answers

2
votes

In the context of Ephesians 2:12, it means "without"

No, in Ephesians 2:12, it means strangers or foreigners.

Ephesians 2:12 (NIV)

remember that at that time you were separate from Christ, excluded from citizenship in Israel and foreigners to the covenants of the promise, without hope and without God in the world.

.

Efesios 2:12 (NVI)

recuerden que en ese entonces ustedes estaban separados de Cristo, excluidos de la ciudadanía de Israel y ajenos a los pactos de la promesa, sin esperanza y sin Dios en el mundo.

It has a passel of meanings, but they are all related...strange(r), remote, far off, alien, foreign(er).

He comes from a strange land = He comes from a remote or far-off land

He is an alien = He is a foreigner = He is a stranger to these parts

updated JUL 6, 2010
posted by webdunce
I disagree. In 2:12 it means they were "without the covenant of the promise". - Jack-OBrien, JUL 6, 2010
Why wouldn't "extrañero" be used for "foreigner". - Jack-OBrien, JUL 6, 2010
You are both correct since someone who is a stranger to the Covenant of Promise is by implication Without the Covanant of Promise - FELIZ77, JUL 6, 2010
I agree Feliz. :-) - webdunce, JUL 6, 2010
1
vote

Jack,

Well I was wrong to imply that ajeno is a noun (I thought it could be a noun or an adjective in Spanish, but it is apparently only an adjective). red face

However, it can be translated as a noun into English.

ajeno a algo => foreign/alien/strange to something => a foreigner/stranger to something

In my mind, to be without the covenant and to be a foreigner to the covenant are nearly equal concepts, aren't they? However, that doesn't mean that ajeno = without. And it also doesn't mean foreigner, either (I was wrong). It means foreign, far-off, remote or whatever. It's an adjective -- not a noun (foreigner) and not a preposition (without).

Even though ajeno doesn't mean either without or foreigner, I would consider without the covenant and foreigners to the covenant to both be valid translations of ajenos a los pactos de la promesa.

Also, what English version of the Bible are you reading? Several of them are using foreigners or strangers to the covenant. I haven't found one yet that uses "without the covenant." (But, there are several versions, and I didn't check them all.) Ajeno can also mean to not have knowledge of something, which is a sense some versions bring out (like the Amplified Bible).

Cheers.

updated JUL 6, 2010
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
In "Scottish" parlance it would mean something like "outwith". - lagartijaverde, JUL 6, 2010
En mi Biblia dice " Alejados de la cuidadanía de Israel y 'ajenos' a los pactos..." etc... - FELIZ77, JUL 6, 2010
La Biblia Santa 1960 Sociedades Unidas - FELIZ77, JUL 6, 2010
Thanks Pablo, "Alejados de la cuidadanía de Israel" makes a lot more sense now. - Jack-OBrien, JUL 6, 2010
0
votes

Jack did you see this too?

ajeno, na.

(Del lat. ali?nus, de al?us, otro).

  1. adj. Perteneciente a otra persona.

  2. adj. De otra clase o condición.

  3. adj. Distante, lejano, libre de algo. Ajeno de cuidados

  4. adj. Impropio, extraño, no correspondiente. Ajeno a su voluntad

  5. adj. Que no tiene conocimiento de algo, o no está prevenido de lo que ha de suceder.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

updated JUL 6, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
No, I did not. I have certainly learned a new word today. Thanks Marianne! - Jack-OBrien, JUL 6, 2010
0
votes

Ajeno relation with strange:

4...no correspondiente: not corresponding ( then , is stranger )

updated JUL 6, 2010
posted by kawalero
0
votes

Webdunce wrote:

Well I was wrong to imply that ajeno is a noun (I thought it could be a noun or an adjective in Spanish, but it is apparently only an adjective). red face

However, it can be translated as a noun into English.

ajeno a algo => foreign/alien/strange to something => a foreigner/stranger to something

In my mind, to be without the covenant and to be a foreigner to the covenant are nearly equal concepts, aren't they? However, that doesn't mean that ajeno = without. And it also doesn't mean foreigner, either (I was wrong). It means foreign, far-off, remote or whatever. It's an adjective -- not a noun (foreigner) and not a preposition (without).

Even though ajeno doesn't mean either without or foreigner, I would consider without the covenant and foreigners to the covenant to both be valid translations of ajenos a los pactos de la promesa.

I have to agree. I think that these terms mean about the same thing.

Also, what English version of the Bible are you reading? Several of them are using foreigners or strangers to the covenant. I haven't found one yet that uses "without the covenant." (But, there are several versions, and I didn't check them all.) Ajeno can also mean to not have knowledge of something, which is a sense some versions bring out (like the Amplified Bible).

This example was from the NVI, but I read several different versions. The thing is, just because it says something in English doesn't mean that it's going to say the same thing in Spanish. I've been particularly distressed by Hebrew idoms being translated into literal English and then sometimes translated into a Spanish idiom. However, that's for another day. Back to the point though, I've never heard of a person being referred to as an "ajeno", I've only heard "extrañero", so when I look up "ajeno" in the dictionary, I'm further confused because the primary definition is strange, yet not one of the examples use it as meaning strange. I'm still not understanding how strange even fits into the definition.

Cheers.

Thanks very much. I appreciate your thoughts.

updated JUL 6, 2010
posted by Jack-OBrien
0
votes

All I can give you is the example I know:

Amor ajeno = love with a mistress, someone outside your relationship, a stranger of sorts.

updated JUL 6, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
Would "amante ajeno" have a similar meaning then? Thanks! - Jack-OBrien, JUL 6, 2010
Yes, indeed, I think that's exactly right. - --Mariana--, JUL 6, 2010
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