HomeQ&AQué te bajes de su caballo alto

Qué te bajes de su caballo alto

2
votes

Does it make sense? You get off your high horse!

3599 views
updated JUL 5, 2010
posted by jeezzle

3 Answers

4
votes

"Get off your high horse" means to get humble. But it does not translate into Spanish. "¡No seas arrogante!"

Similar expressions have very different meanings:

"Bájate de esa nube" - quit daydreaming

"Bájate de la mula" - start paying what you owe.

updated JUL 5, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
Supongo que debo aceptarlo entonces amigo. Gracias. - jeezzle, JUL 5, 2010
Gekko these are two expressions meaning the opposite of each other so of course they will not translate into similar expressions - FELIZ77, JUL 5, 2010
2
votes

There is an expression: "To get on your high horse"

(I am not aware of one that says 'to get off your high horse')

= ponerse muy arrogante

por ejemplo:

Se puso muy arrogante

= He got on his high horse

I hope that this helps grin

updated JUL 5, 2010
edited by FELIZ77
posted by FELIZ77
Wierd. - jeezzle, JUL 5, 2010
Why weird, Jeezle? - FELIZ77, JUL 5, 2010
Never heard it that way. Get on your high horse is a new one to me. - jeezzle, JUL 5, 2010
Really? I've never heard it that way either, Feliz. Maybe it's different where you live? Or, maybe you're thinking of "He got on his soapbox"? - webdunce, JUL 5, 2010
Perhaps it may be different on opposites sides of the Atlantic, as I agree with Feliz. In my dict, "to get on one's high horse" is given as "darse infulas" - peregrinamaria, JUL 5, 2010
It's probably that over here in the states, people are more likely to use the phrase as a command...as in "get off your high horse!" as opposed to using in reference to a 3rd person. - webdunce, JUL 5, 2010
1
vote

This made me so curious I searched and found some ideas: Deja esa actitud altanera Basta ya de soberbia and then this one which sounds like it just might be a straight translation but I don't know bájate de tu pedestal

updated JUL 5, 2010
posted by margaretbl
Good ones! - 00813f2a, JUL 5, 2010
Thx so much Roberto, and I had completely forgotten the word 'soberbia' so now I have rediscovered - margaretbl, JUL 5, 2010
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