HomeQ&AWhat's the difference between "antiguo" and "viejo"?

What's the difference between "antiguo" and "viejo"?

4
votes

I was wondering what the difference is between "antiguas" and "veijos" was. They both seem to mean old, but when do I know what to use each one?

19568 views
updated JUL 9, 2015
edited by --Mariana--
posted by Steen

2 Answers

4
votes

I would say that "antiguo" is used form something antique or ancient, and "viejo" to mean old.

The adjective "Viejo" used after a noun would mean "old" as used up. "Un perro viejo" = An old dog. However, if you use it before the noun it means something different -- "Un viejo amigo" = An old friend (long-time friend).

An example of the difference in "viejo" and "antiguo" is:

Una casa antigua = a old-fashioned, vintage house Una casa vieja = an old house (used up)

You don't really use the word "viejo" for people (unless it's a nickname) because it's sort of rude. If you want to say that someone is "old-fashioned" you'd use "antigua" such as:

"Su tío es un antiguo" = Her uncle is very old-fashioned

updated JUL 9, 2015
posted by --Mariana--
2
votes

Here's a great thread on it: link text

updated JUL 9, 2015
posted by jeezzle
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