HomeQ&ABotar vs. Lanzar? Please explain to me about different between these two verbs.

Botar vs. Lanzar? Please explain to me about different between these two verbs.

1
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Please explain different use and meaning of these two verbs Botar and Lanzar.

3109 views
updated JUN 27, 2010
posted by ujustu4u

2 Answers

1
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Welcome to the forum.

Are you referring to a specific context, such as basketball? "lanzar" is used meaning "to shoot (at the basket).

In baseball, "lanzar" is "to pitch".

If you are referring to garbage, "botar" is used meaning "to toss" or "to throw out".

If you are referring to personal conduct, "botar" means "to kick someone out".

There are differences in meaning depending on country and context. If you have a specific context or country in mind, please clarify. Other than that, MacFadden has done a good job of explaining it to you.

updated JUN 27, 2010
posted by mountaingirl123
1
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Hello, and welcome to the forum. If you look in the dictionary at the top of the page, you will find that, though they have some overlapping definitions, there are certain differences, which their respective dictionary entries should make apparent. Is there something that those definitions didn't answer that you still have a question about?

It gives bounce, launch, throw/kick out, and jump as translations of botar and to throw, hurl or fling with force, to kick, drop, fire, launch, let out, and release as translations of lanzar.

updated JUN 27, 2010
edited by MacFadden
posted by MacFadden
I looked at the dictionary and examples but I still dont have clear understanding of these two verbs. - ujustu4u, JUN 27, 2010
Okay. What exactly is your confusion? Their meanings do overlap, but the dictionary points out when each one is used. There are some cases when both are appropraiate. - MacFadden, JUN 27, 2010
Thanks for MacFadden and Mountaingirl. Appreciate your clarification. Please be patient with me. I am a newbie here. - ujustu4u, JUN 27, 2010
Excellent post, MacFadden. :) - mountaingirl123, JUN 27, 2010
You're welcome. I hope I didn't sound less than patient with you; I certainly didn't mean to. - MacFadden, JUN 27, 2010
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