HomeQ&AAdjectives ending in "ed" and "ing".

Adjectives ending in "ed" and "ing".

9
votes

I belong to a Learn English site for Spanish speakers. I sometime, as in this case, find it more informative to hear English grammar explained in Spanish than Spanish grammar explained in English. This lesson is on adjectives ending in "ed" and "ing". I understand the differences in English of course, but noticed a difference in Spanish that I hadn't noticed before. Here is the lesson: alt text alt text alt text

1) all of the "ing" adjectives use Ser and adjective forms of the word (save one)

2) all of the "ed" adjectives use Estar and the past participle of the verb as an adjective

I understand the differences of why Estar and Ser are used as described in the lesson.

My question is about the very first example.

Susan's job is boring.

El trabajo de Susan is aburrido. (Ser is used with the past participle rather than aburridor. All other examples with Ser use aburridor and not the p.p.)

Is this allowed in Spanish? Can the past participle adjective be used for "ing" adjectives? Was it just a coincidence here that they only used a past participle for an "ing" adjective once, or was the first example incorrect?

23668 views
updated OCT 13, 2011
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
My take, aburrido happens to be an adjective as well as a past participle. - webdunce, JUN 27, 2010
Interesting. The shoe on the other foot in the ser / estar problem. The difference between Susan is bored and Susan is boring...I can see how it could be confusing. - webdunce, JUN 27, 2010
Quentin do you mind sharing the English site for Spanish speakers as I'd be keen to help out :) - Kiwi-Girl, JUN 27, 2010

8 Answers

6
votes

HI quentin, aburridoR is a typo, it does not exist.

I teach students of English the same pattern:

ed = estar

ing = ser

Estoy aburrida , I am bored.

Soy aburrida, I am boring.

updated JUN 27, 2010
posted by 00494d19
Actually, I just now see aburridor in the dictionary. I didn't even notice this whole aburridoR deal. - webdunce, JUN 27, 2010
Webdunce and I are on the same timeschedule. I'm glad it's a typo because to me, aburridor is a someone who is bored for a living. - jeezzle, JUN 27, 2010
1
vote

I don't know how useful you will find this site. They offer free audio/written lessons in English. I have no interest in them. I never download them. They publish a free newsletter (you get it by email) that links to the lessons and contain explanations of the grammar involved in the lessons. There are also sample sentences taken from the lesson to explain the grammar and a list of the vocabulary involved in the lessons. All of these have the Spanish counterpart provided which is all that I pay attention to. All of the instructions, explanations, etc. are in Spanish so that is interesting to read. Take what Spanish you can from the site and forget the English lessons themselves. (unless your English grammar could use a little polishing). grin

Here is a link to the site if you are interested

Heidita:

I understood the ser=ing and estar=ed. That wasn't what confused me. It was the estar + pp (always) and never Ser + pp (except once) that confused me. Ser was always used with an adjective, but only once with a pp adjective. If you say that soy aburrida (ser + pp) is correct, then that answers my question. Whether it means ed or ing is irrelevant to my question. It must have just been a coincidence that they were not using Ser+pp.

Their examples:

ser+pp only once estar+pp
aburridaaburrida
aburridoraburrida
agotadoragotado
satisfactoriosatisfecho
interesanteinteresado
sorpredentesorprendido
decepcionantedecepcionado
updated JUN 27, 2010
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
Thanx for that link, so as far as their forum goes, you can't see the answers that they have already received? - to save doubling up etc - Kiwi-Girl, JUN 27, 2010
0
votes

I seem to be having a hard time expressing my point. I was only questioning if the past particle can be used with Ser as an adjective. They only showed one occurrence of it being used that way.

Let's try a different article:

Spanish past participle

Notice in this article that it says the past participle can be used as an adjective. Also notice, however, that it is always used with Estar in that context.

Ser+past participle=passive voice.

Soy aburrido. Is not passive voice. Try using an agent with it. Soy aburrido por... Now we're back to "I am bored by" and we've established that bor "ed" is used with Estar, not Ser.

I'm not seeing any support for saying "soy aburrido" as" I am boring". It's beginning to seem that "soy aburridor" is correct.

aburridor, ra.

  1. adj. Que aburre.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

I'm sorry that I ever brought it up. Delete the ^&**(^% thread. grin grin

updated JUN 27, 2010
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
0
votes

As a response (not necessarily an answer...more like a musing), I'm thinking that many past participles might be bona fide adjectives as well -- of which, aburrido is one.

updated JUN 27, 2010
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
There is no doubt that the pp can be an adjective. My only question is can it be an adjective with Ser. They only used it that way once. It is certainly an adjective with estar. - 0074b507, JUN 27, 2010
0
votes

The page of most interest, I think is the grammar index page.

updated JUN 27, 2010
posted by webdunce
That page follows the same pattern ser+adjective other than pp; estar+PP My only question was can you have ser+pp, I don't care what it means. They only showed it once so I wanted to verify if that one instance was correct or not. - 0074b507, JUN 27, 2010
I just meant that the index to grammar articles is the page I'll most be using at that site, which is one of the most confusing-to-look-at sites I've seen in awhile. They links to everything everywhere. - webdunce, JUN 27, 2010
I wanted to provide a link to that part of the site...the home page is overwhelming. - webdunce, JUN 27, 2010
Like I said, I only use the emailed newletter. - 0074b507, JUN 27, 2010
0
votes

Of course, it becomes more difficult when the adjectives precede/follow the nouns (instead of being on the other side of ser / estar).

The bored girl sighed heavily. La niña aburrida...

A boring person will have trouble making friends. Una persona ??? (No sé).

updated JUN 27, 2010
edited by webdunce
posted by webdunce
Una persona que es aburrida tendrá ....Maybe? - Delores--Lindsey, JUN 27, 2010
Creo que tienes razón, Delores. - webdunce, JUN 27, 2010
0
votes

Love the idea about reading English grammar explained in Spanish (to help learn Spanish, I assume). I am also interested in the site, Q.

updated JUN 27, 2010
posted by webdunce
0
votes

I think it works, as I have used it in this way before, but then most of my Mexican friends tell me that things are correct even if they aren't exactly kosher so that doesn't say much, however, I am very interested in more information as to the site that you are a member of because I find this information quite awesome. Can you email me the link if you are unwilling or unable to post it here? Gracias.

updated JUN 27, 2010
posted by jeezzle
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