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I need help with se y le

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What does le and se mean I don't mean like yo sé.

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updated JUN 26, 2010
posted by jamalking

1 Answer

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Se is a pronoun - ie. used in the place of a noun.

It has many uses:

The most common use is as a reflexive pronoun - such pronouns indicate that the subject of a verb is also its object:

She brushes her hair. He gets (himself) up. Paul looks at himself in the mirror. Pablo se ve por el espejo. The parents can't hear themselves. Los padres no pueden oírse.

In English, this is often accomplished by using verbs such as "himself" or "themselves." Se is used as the reflexive pronoun for third-person uses.

Another use is as the equivalent of the English passive voice:

Se abren las puertas. (The doors are opened.)

And then there's the impersonal se:

No se debe comer con prisa. (One ought not to eat quickly.)

And here's some info re: 'le' Le - Indirect Object

English: I am giving him the book. Spanish: Le doy el libro. Explanation: "Book" (libro) is the direct object of the verb because it is the object that is given. The indirect object is "him," because he is the recipient of the action. The English sentence is the equivalent of "I am giving the book to him." English: He showed her the house. Spanish: Le enseñó la casa. Explanation: "House" (casa) is the direct object because it is what was shown. The indirect object is "her," because she is the recipient of the action. The English sentence is the equivalent of "He showed the house to her." English: They are serving us the dinner. Spanish: Nos sirven la cena. Explanation: "Dinner" (cena) is the direct object because it is what is being served. The indirect object is "us," because we are the recipients of the action. The English sentence is the equivalent of "They are serving the dinner to us."

Le Direct Object

In Spain when the direct object is a person people use as direct object pronouns le / les.

¿(Tú) Ves a Claudia? Sí, le veo (“le” is the direct object pronoun used to replace the noun “Claudia”). In Latin America la(s) / lo(s) are used for people, animals and things

updated JUN 26, 2010
edited by Kiwi-Girl
posted by Kiwi-Girl
pronominal se (comerse, ovlvidarse), detransitizing se (hundirse), reciprocal se, se as i.o.p (3rd person) and probably 100 others that I don't know about yet. Very versatile word. - 0074b507, JUN 26, 2010
Very true, I could feel myself getting carried away lol and thought I should stop there :) - Kiwi-Girl, JUN 26, 2010
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