HomeQ&A"Tattletale" and "To Tattle" in Spanish

"Tattletale" and "To Tattle" in Spanish

1
vote

How do you say tattletale and to tattle in Spanish? I've found a few words that I think might be right for tattletale, una chimosa o un chivato. In English the word tattletale connotes a child. So, the Spanish equivalent of rat or stoolie isn't exactly what I'm looking for. Gracias!

22974 views
updated AGO 6, 2010
posted by Helind

8 Answers

3
votes

For "tattle-tale," maybe you could use "cuentista"

[Persona] que cuenta mentiras, chismes, o que exagera la realidad:

I would think that "chismosa" might be ok to use as well

Chismosa Que chismea o es dado a chismear

Although this is probably more like "gossip" than "tattle-tale (although it might be argued that the expression "tattle-tale" is really just a euphemism for a "gossip" or a "liar").

"To tattle" is simply "to talk idly, gossip, chatter, reveal other peoples secrets or tell tales (hence the term tattle-tale), and you could definitely use "chismear" or "chismorear" for this

EDIT:

I just found the following and thought that I would add it to what has already been said: acusica, acusón and acusete all apparently mean tattle-tale

updated AGO 6, 2010
edited by Izanoni1
posted by Izanoni1
In the Phils. we call them "tsismoso/a" because we don't have the letter "C" in our alphabet. :) - Rikko, JUN 26, 2010
Izanoni I agree I see no difference between tittle tattle and gossip both are forms of idle chatter - FELIZ77, JUN 26, 2010
except actually that Gossip can be more destructive as it can be a form of character assasination/liibellous - FELIZ77, JUN 26, 2010
I should have said I see little difference rather than none as theer seems to be some difference - FELIZ77, JUN 26, 2010
3
votes

I asked my Spanish teacher, who is from Costa Rica, yesterday about tattletale. After thinking about it a bit, she came up with un acusetas. I also spoke to a native Spanish speaker from Mexico. She said that she didn't know that particular word but that it made since to her. The verb to tattle is acusar.

In my search for a translation, I also learned that in English some people use telltale instead of tattletale. I'm from Virginia, in the southern United States. We always used tattletale.

For example:

A child takes a toy from his sister. The sister says, "I'm telling, Mommy!" The brother says, "Don't be a tattletale!"

updated AGO 6, 2010
posted by Helind
I think you mean ' it made sense to her' (not since) acusar = to accuse it can mean to tell on someone (report them) - FELIZ77, JUL 2, 2010
You're right! I'm a terrible speller. I need to be more careful. Thanks for pointing that out. - Helind, JUL 2, 2010
2
votes

Having 3 kids, I can absolutely say that in Mexico it's Chismoso.

No seas chismoso!

You also could safely say acusón. (accuser), but really, it's chismoso.

updated AGO 6, 2010
posted by petersenkid2
2
votes

I agee with Helind = in this case the closest to the idea of tattletale (for a child) would be 'acusetas'. It can be used for a tattler also...

updated AGO 6, 2010
posted by margaretbl
2
votes

How do you say tattletale and to tattle in Spanish? I

tittle tattle = Chismes n

to tittle tattle = Chismorrear vi (Colloquial expression/idiom)

gossip = Chismorreo n (masc)

updated JUL 2, 2010
posted by FELIZ77
2
votes

Hola,

En Colombia se dice "sapear"= tattle. También se puede decir "soplón".

updated JUL 2, 2010
posted by LuisaGomezBartle
1
vote

All of the above work, plus in Mexico we also say, "La fuente de información."

updated JUL 2, 2010
posted by 005faa61
Hola J, is there something for a child specifically? Like to me the others are more grownups (gossip etc) or mob stuff? - margaretbl, JUL 2, 2010
Petersenkid is right - 005faa61, JUL 2, 2010
1
vote

Hola,

Encontré esto:

argüende. (De argüir). 1. m. El Salv. y Méx. chismorreo. 2. m. El Salv. pleito (? disputa).

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updated JUL 2, 2010
posted by LuisaGomezBartle
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