HomeQ&AMonte means woods?

Monte means woods?

0
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I have read a lot of dictionaries including this site that say monte means woodlands!!! So Monte means woods?

Heres a official definiton from Real Academia Espanola: Tierra inculta cubierta con arboles, arbustos o matas

2556 views
updated JUN 19, 2010
posted by mestizo7
Didn't we discuss this already? - waltico, JUN 19, 2010
Many times. - 0074b507, JUN 19, 2010
Nine, by my count. - MacFadden, JUN 19, 2010

3 Answers

4
votes

You have asked nine questions about the meaning of the word monte, some almost identical to each other. Almost all of your threads have received several helpful and complete answers. There is no reason to "get mad" as you say you are. It's very simple. Bosque means 'forest'. Monte, in addition to meaning 'mountain', can also mean 'woods'. You can see this in almost any Spanish-English dictionary. You can also see it in Spanish dictionaries. Here you have the second definition of monte from the RAE:

Tierra inculta cubierta de árboles, arbustos o matas.

which mans "uncultivated land covered with trees, bushes and shrubs." The RAE's definition of bosque (which means woods) is "sitio poblado de árboles y matas," which means "place full of trees and bushes." That sounds about equivalent to 'woods' to me. Therefore, we can conclude that one of the definitions of monte is 'woods.' If you ever have a further concern about the definition of monte or bosque, please explain your question more clearly than you have in the past, because each of your past questions seems to me to have been answered satisfactorily, and yet we do not seem to have been able to deprive you of your curiosity about their meanings. We want to help you with your Spanish, but if you still don't understand, you will need to be more specific.

Perhaps your underlying concern stems from the fact that monte sounds like mount or mountain, and that Spanish already has a word for woods--bosque. If this is why you keep asking questions about the difference between the two words, you just have to accept that sometimes Spanish words don't match up exactly with the words they sound like in English, and sometimes they other have unrelated meanings. Despite the two words' similarity, the two languages have developed different words out of the shared Latin root and their meanings are not identical.

Please tell me if this has answered your questions. Post a comment on this answer or accept it or something to let me know one way or the other. I want to solve this once and for all.

updated JUN 19, 2010
edited by MacFadden
posted by MacFadden
0
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Im getting mad I dont like the word bosque

Then I suggest never going to Mexico City as there are directional signs everywhere that say " Bosque de Chapultepec."

updated JUN 19, 2010
posted by 005faa61
0
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Im getting mad I dont like the word bosque

updated JUN 19, 2010
posted by mestizo7
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