HomeQ&A"Te echo de menos" and "Me haces mucha falta"

"Te echo de menos" and "Me haces mucha falta"

3
votes

te echo de menos & me haces mucha falta means..?!

17978 views
updated NOV 22, 2010
edited by --Mariana--
posted by Ibrahim-Nashaat

15 Answers

4
votes

To say "I miss you"....

"Te echo de menos" is used more in Spain, and "Te extraño" is used more in Latin America.

updated NOV 21, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
2
votes

I was just trying to get a sense for what the phrase is saying in Spanish. I still don't get it. Does it mean "I cast you from the unimportant?"

No, what it (both expressions, actually) means is "I miss you." The fact that it results in nonsense when translated word-by-word, is irrelevant.

Unless you know of some method for conveying/expressing meaning that is independent of all natural languages, the most that you can ask for is "How is this idea expressed in such-and-such language. Languages differ as do how they express ideas. To suggest that any given language has the only/correct way of expressing a thought and that other languages should be judged by their approximation to that "ideal;" is, at best, parochial.

updated NOV 22, 2010
edited by samdie
posted by samdie
Sí, tienes razón...estoy completamente de accuerdo contigo, Samdie :) - FELIZ77, NOV 21, 2010
2
votes

It's impossible to translate things word for word and make sense. Part of learning languages. Your welcome !!! What does that really mean. Welcome to come in my house? De nada. For nothing. You mean you would normally charge me for giving you a compliment or opening the door from you!!!
In french you say tu me manages. You are missing from me or n'importe quoi :
Not important what. To say "what ever" or "yeah your making it up".

Don't get a headache. Just learn the idiomatic statements and accept they don't sound funny to the locals, like our sayings "oh my god" (is he really YOUR God?). "I get you" (where do you get me from the second shelf from the store or e bay under human beings?). "second to none" (isn't it easier to say FIRST). "Mark my words" (ok I will Mark them, but I must advise you I am not a school teacher so the Mark I give you will be based on our friendship! Not your spelling or grammar) cool hmm

updated NOV 22, 2010
posted by Pigletohdear
It's "You're welcome!" - pesta, NOV 22, 2010
2
votes

I miss you! I miss you a lot!

updated NOV 21, 2010
posted by Gocika
1
vote

Okay, te echo de menos is giving me a headache. What is it trying to say? "I cast you from the least" perhaps? Like, I've moved you into the category of things important to me?

It makes perfect sense if you consider that in English you miss someone when they are so far away that if you tried to shoot them and kill them, you would miss them.

updated NOV 22, 2010
posted by lorenzo9
I thought of that, and thought I was being original.... :-) - pesta, NOV 22, 2010
1
vote

Okay, te echo de menos is giving me a headache. What is it trying to say? "I cast you from the least" perhaps? Like, I've moved you into the category of things important to me?

updated NOV 21, 2010
posted by webdunce
Jejeje - --Mariana--, JUN 24, 2010
I have never understood that expression. - mediterrunio, NOV 21, 2010
1
vote

In the phrasebook, "no haces falta" means "I don't need it". So wouldn't "me haces mucho falta" be "I need you a lot"?

updated NOV 21, 2010
posted by DR1960
1
vote

Hi Web, you know that 'de menos' can mean 'least' or 'less' and 'echar' is so colloquial so analyzing it as 'cast out' in this case I don't think really works. Have you had a look at all the set phrases with 'echar' - it is very interesting. I just accept it means missing someone and that's it. It's a good one to ponder all right. wink wink

updated NOV 21, 2010
posted by margaretbl
1
vote

I was just trying to get a sense for what the phrase is saying in Spanish. I still don't get it. Does it mean "I cast you from the unimportant?"

updated NOV 21, 2010
posted by webdunce
I guess it's the de menos I'm having problems with. - webdunce, NOV 21, 2010
1
vote

There is a really good cumbia song by Grupo 5 called "La Falta Que Me Haces" which may help you understand these types of phrases more as it would give you some more context smile

You can listen to the song via videos on you tube, just search for "Grupo 5, la falta que me haces". And here is a link to the lyrics as well:

http://www.lyricstime.com/grupo-5-la-falta-que-me-haces-lyrics.html

Hope this helps!

updated NOV 21, 2010
posted by amy_moreno
1
vote

muchas gracias smile

updated NOV 21, 2010
posted by Ibrahim-Nashaat
1
vote

I miss you and I need you very much.

updated NOV 21, 2010
posted by 00813f2a
0
votes

Te is an indirect object pronoun, so you can think of it as

Te echo de menos a ti.

"de menos" means too little end "echo" means "I see" in this case (echar can mean almost anything, depending on context) so the literal translation to English is:

I see you too little.
I see too little of you.

updated NOV 22, 2010
posted by lorenzo9
0
votes

While we're on the subject of set phrases, here are a few in English that you might want to consider:

Let 'er rip! - usually there is no her nor any ripping invoved, and often no letting.

Okey dokey, Pokey! - while the longevity of Gumby is amazing, this phrase is difficult to translate word for word to any language, including English.

Send someone up the river - this one is relatively easy, but still. . .

Trip the light fantastic - an oldie but goodie, and as incomprehensible as ever

updated NOV 22, 2010
posted by lorenzo9
I knew that as "Sell someone down the river", probably from Huckleberry Finn. - pesta, NOV 22, 2010
0
votes

Okay, I think I was unclear. For it to say "I cast you from the least" or "I cast you from the unimportant" is not total gobbledy-gook. I can see how such a phrase could be used to mean "I miss you."

I was, more or less, asking for confirmation as to whether or not I had correctly guessed the sense of "de menos" as it is used in this phrase. I believe it has the sense of "from the unimportant things." Am I right?

updated NOV 22, 2010
posted by webdunce
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.