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Me acepté tal cual soy

1
vote

Everyone

I'm doing what I hope is "light reading" considering the magazine is called "TV Y Novellas" and I'm doing sort of ok. I ran into a Q&A section with some celeb named Thalía and she says the following:

"Estoy balanceada,aceptada. Finalmente hice la paz conmigo misma; me acepté tal cual soy, con defectos, virtudes, buenos y malos ratos...."

The gist is obvious but I have 3 grammar issues.

  1. The adjective "balanceado" doesn't seem to exist.

Neither my 3 dictionaries nor your site seem to know about it. My guess would be "balanced" but then again that is always translated as "equilibrado".

  1. The adjective "aceptado" doesn't seem to exist either.

Same problem and here I'm not even sure what she wants to convey. She feels accepted or acceptable ?

  1. "Me acepté". None of my dictionaries mention "aceptarse" at all. You guys only have one translation "to be pleased" but that doesn't make a lot of sense. This would translate her sentence into "I was pleased with who I am".

I'm pretty sure she is saying "I accepted (or have come to accept) myself as I am..." so it looks to me like "aceptarse" is one of the fewer pronominal verbs that actually mean just what they say "to (insert verb here) oneself" rather than a case where reflexive use changes the meaning of the verb.

Thoughts ?

2451 views
updated JUN 7, 2010
posted by stucky101

6 Answers

2
votes

Balanceado = balancear

Aceptado = aceptar

Both are participles used as adjectives.

updated JUN 7, 2010
edited by Goyo
posted by Goyo
1
vote

Guys

Yes, I was aware of the participles but clearly they were used here as adjectives. Does this mean that "aceptado" exists only as a participle but is also commonly used as adjective ? If yes is that grammatically correct ? If so wouldn't it be more correct to say that "aceptado" is both a participle and an adjective ?

I guess I'm confused about the "participle used as an adjective" part of your answer.

Is this accepted colloquialism or 100% correct ? If correct shouldn't the adjective be properly documented as well ?

I know I'm being a hair-splitter right now but it's because I still often mix up adjectives and participles since they're usually so similar so it helps to have them clearly marked.

updated JUN 7, 2010
posted by stucky101
Dictionaries ain't perfect and their editorial committees make a great many decisions about what should or should not be included, often based on frequency of use or other considerations like forgetfulness or even prejudice. - geofc, JUN 6, 2010
As a rule of thumb, any participle of any verb can be used adjectivally. - geofc, JUN 6, 2010
1
vote

Thanks everyone. That's pretty much what I thought but I wanted to doublecheck.

updated JUN 7, 2010
posted by stucky101
1
vote

You can make reflexive verbs out of many verbs just to mean that you're doing it to yourself or that the action of the verb is reflected towards yourself. Therefore, not ALL of them might be in the dictionary. Like in english, you can add "yourself" to many verbs to get the same effect. Same with participles used as adjectives, just look for the main verb. Balenceado(a) does mean balanced, such as "una dieta balenceada" - a balanced diet.

updated JUN 7, 2010
posted by socceryo3
1
vote

If you double click on the words "balanceado" and "aceptado", a translation should appear in blue on your screen. In this case, "balanced" and "accepted" were shown.

A quick way to translate words in a post. Still some limitations though...

updated JUN 7, 2010
posted by DR1960
0
votes

You are definitely on the right track. See Goyo's answers.

me acepté tal cual soy = I accepted myself as I am.

updated JUN 6, 2010
posted by waltico
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