HomeQ&AQué pereza con los hombres

Qué pereza con los hombres

4
votes

My friend used this expression the other day in writing "¡Qué pereza con los hombres!".

Although literally word for word it doesn't mean this, but I took it as to translate something along the lines of: "Men are so lazy!", or "How lazy men are!"

Is that correct? And, if so, I don't understand why the con is used? Was son meant instead? Qué pereza son los hombres ?

5273 views
updated JUN 4, 2010
posted by cheeseisyummy
con was correct. common usage, but I can't think of other verb examples at the moment - 0074b507, JUN 1, 2010
Sorry, q!! I've been calling you "gfreed" (couldn't tell with the underlining). - waltico, JUN 1, 2010
common problem with names here. I pay it no attention. - 0074b507, JUN 1, 2010

10 Answers

4
votes

One of my Mexican friends uses a similar expression: "qué flojera con..." or "xxx.. me da mucha flojera", to mean that this person / situation bugs me, or "I'm fed up with...it".

I find it very strange, because I would never use the words "pereza" or "flojera" (laziness) in that manner - but as Q. states, it apparently is common use in some places.

I do not think it means "Men are so lazy". At least the way my friend uses it, it means "I'm fed up with men!", "I don't want to deal /be bothered with men".

updated JUN 4, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
jeje, knowing my friend, she probably did mean 'I don't want to deal /be bothered with men'... sigh girl drama... - cheeseisyummy, JUN 1, 2010
I menat that usage of con was common, not the entire phrase. - 0074b507, JUN 1, 2010
In any event, I am pretty sure she does *not* mean "Men are lazy". More along the lines "men are a headache". - Gekkosan, JUN 1, 2010
Oh, I don't know. For some reason both seem appropriate to me. :-) - 0074b507, JUN 1, 2010
I agree! This phrase does not mean "Men are so lazy". - tamalmalamarrado, JUN 1, 2010
Very interesting what you're saying :) Such phrases enter women's heads almost automatically ;) - bomberapolaca, JUN 4, 2010
2
votes

¡Qué pereza la de los hombres!

updated JUN 1, 2010
posted by 00813f2a
2
votes

"Pereza" is a noun, rather than the adjective "perezoso."

The "con" looks correct. "What laziness with men" is how I read it, but we'd say "Men are lazy."

updated JUN 1, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
"¡Qué pereza ... " - We'd say "Men are so lazy!" (And my wife would agree.) :) - waltico, JUN 1, 2010
Jejeje..I have to disagree with her. I have a very hard-working man. - --Mariana--, JUN 1, 2010
1
vote

Ok, I finally was able to ask her what she meant by her statement and this was her response:

"significa que estoy desepcionada de los hombres"

updated JUN 4, 2010
posted by cheeseisyummy
"decepcionada". So I was right! She did *not* mean that the men are lazy! She's disappointed in men! :-) - Gekkosan, JUN 2, 2010
1
vote

For 54 years in my country of Cuba that has been the meaning of that phrase...unless you know of something new that I don't know...but the way your post is wrong. - robertico

Flojera means tiredness. - robertico

Yes, both observations are essentially correct: "flojera" means tiredness, sloth, lazyness. However, this exact construction of the phrase, "¡qué flojera con los hombres!" is not the most common usage in many places.

In my view, because of my experience with speakers from different countries, "qué pereza" in this context most probably refers not to the men, but to the speaker. In other words, it is my belief that the speaker is expressing that she feels tiredness when she thinks about the men - not that the men themselves are necessarily lazy. Of course, she could be fed up because the men are lazy: "¡Qué pereza con esos hombres flojos!", for example.

The fact is, we won't know for sure until we have a chance to ask the lady in question just what exactly she meant. Usage varies, sometimes significantly, from one place to the other.

Where I'm from, nobody would think of saying "qué pereza con los hombres" or "qué flojera con los hombres". We might say "¡que hombres perezosos!" to mean the men are lazy, or "me da flojera ver a esos hombres trabajar", to mean that I feel tired just watching those guys work.

updated JUN 2, 2010
edited by Gekkosan
posted by Gekkosan
Interesting viewpoint. - 0074b507, JUN 1, 2010
I have never seen pereza being used in that context but even it were right it doesn't mean that my two examples don't mean what I said they mean. - 00813f2a, JUN 1, 2010
Sorry, Robertico. I should have made a more complete comment. I meant that I do not believe that "qué pereza con los hombres" means "men are so lazy". - Gekkosan, JUN 1, 2010
You also have to take in consideration the source and what type of slang they are using because a lot of people use a lot of ïnside"slang while others simply don't even know the basics of their own language. - 00813f2a, JUN 1, 2010
Yes, that is correct. - Gekkosan, JUN 1, 2010
Ok, in that case I agree with Marianne's comment. More to the point would be "que perezosos son los hombres" - 00813f2a, JUN 1, 2010
Please see Cheese's last comment with the lady's explanation of what she meant. - Gekkosan, JUN 2, 2010
1
vote

Qué pereza con los hombres

¡Qué pereza la de los hombres!

Men are soooo lazy!!!

They both mean the above.

updated JUN 1, 2010
posted by 00813f2a
I do not agree that both mean the same. - Gekkosan, JUN 1, 2010
For 54 years in my country of Cuba that has been the meaning of that phrase...unless you know of something new that I don't know...but the way your post is wrong. - 00813f2a, JUN 1, 2010
Flojera means tiredness. - 00813f2a, JUN 1, 2010
1
vote

Qué pereza con los hombres So just to clarify please, did we come to the conclusion that this means 'Men are so tiresome'? Or kind of 'it's so tiresome dealing with men'. I know 'tener pereza' is 'I feel lazy' Has anyone entered in the Phrasebook?

updated JUN 1, 2010
posted by margaretbl
I think "Men are so tiresome" is an excellent interpretation. But I don't know that everyone else agrees with me on this one yet. - Gekkosan, JUN 1, 2010
I like this interpretation best based on knowing the personality of who wrote it, but im gonna wait before accepting to see if any more natives weigh in with their opinion to be sure... - cheeseisyummy, JUN 1, 2010
0
votes

Shes kind of sick of men.

updated JUN 4, 2010
posted by Rey_Mysterio
0
votes

Ok, now I'm going to have to ask her what she meant when she wrote it I guess, since there is a debate on the definition. For the record I heard it from a costa rican girl, and no she wasn't saying it directed at me wink

I think both translations are good, maybe it just depends on the person, situation, and area / country / region they are from as to the exact meaning?

I'll ask and see what it meant to her. Unfortunately this could take a while as she is slow.... speaking of lazy jeje LOL

updated JUN 2, 2010
posted by cheeseisyummy
Tell us when to move to the cranky-pants thread, haha. - margaretbl, JUN 1, 2010
you are already there...this is all-in-one - 00813f2a, JUN 2, 2010
0
votes

Here we go again with the anti-men stuff (Cranky speaking)

. Photobucket

"Who you calling lazy?" "What - tiresome - what mean that?"

updated JUN 1, 2010
edited by ian-hill
posted by ian-hill
Worst part is the original question was asked by a man. He must have been wondering what some woman said about him. - 0074b507, JUN 1, 2010
Yeah - but he is a bit dodgy (cheesy) - ian-hill, JUN 1, 2010
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