HomeQ&APasar la aspiradora

Pasar la aspiradora

3
votes

Hi,I have just finished lesson 1.13 commands and chores.Why is it pasar la aspiradora,this sounds funny to me as i always DO the hoovering(vacuuming),is hacer not a better verb to use?

9475 views
updated MAY 27, 2010
posted by Gez

7 Answers

3
votes

Gez,

Heidita is right. (And really, Heidita is always right about Spanish. She will never lead you astray!)

What it comes down to is this: Spanish works differently than English. That's a fact that you need to get settled in your understanding. It's not just a matter of substituting Spanish words for English ones, as if Spanish was some kind of secret code. The mechanics and word choices of it are often completely different.

As an example, you mentioned the word hacer. That is a word very often used in desciptions of the weather. "Hace sol"- it is sunny. "Hace calor"- it is hot.

Why? "Porque sí". (Because it is.) smile

updated MAY 27, 2010
posted by Goyo
2
votes

Novia mía, I've never heard the word "hoover" used as a verb. We have a verb "hover", which has nothing to do with a vacuum cleaner. - Goyo

Hmmm, this is very British then.

hoover (BrE) verbo transitivo pasar la aspiradora or el aspirador por, aspirar (AmL)

I didn't know, I thought you also used that, seeeeeeee, one learns something everyday! wink

So you would never "pass the vacuum cleaner" then? Run the vacuum cleaner...would never have ocurred to me.

updated MAY 27, 2010
posted by 00494d19
I am floored by this! I had no idea that they "hoover" in GB! But you are correct, the use of "pass" in reference to vacuuming would be limited to "in one pass" statements such as you found. At least in my limited experience of English. jejeje. - Goyo, MAY 27, 2010
I've never said "pass" the vacuum cleaner. Come for a visit...I'll teach you the phrase AND let you RUN it! :) - tennismom, MAY 27, 2010
Tennismom, I think you'll go for anything that has someone else running your vacuum cleaner. lol - Goyo, MAY 27, 2010
2
votes

How do these things get online?

hoover as a verb

to hoover (third-person singular simple present hoovers, present participle hoovering, simple past and past participle hoovered)

(transitive, British) To clean (a room, etc) with a vacuum cleaner, irrespective of brand.

I need to hoover this room.

(intransitive, British) To use a vacuum cleaner, irrespective of brand. My husband is upstairs, hoovering.

(transitive) To suck in or inhale, as if by a vacuum cleaner.

1998 Bill Bryson, A Walk in the Woods, Anchor Books, p. 8 ...organisms called hantaviruses, which swarm in the micro-haze above the feces of mice and rats and are hoovered into the human respiratory system by anyone unlucky enough to stick a breathing orifice near them...

updated MAY 27, 2010
edited by 0074b507
posted by 0074b507
1
vote

HI gez, no, you cannot use hacer here, mainly because in English you use the verb in Spanish the noun.

to hoover: aspirar

to do the hoovering: aspirar

to pass the hoover : pasar el aspirador (as it seems seldom used or maybe never?)

Interesting:

In one pass, the Hoover lightweight bagged upright removes more dirt*

So you can say in one pass, however I only found one entry for "pass the hoover"...big surprise

updated MAY 27, 2010
posted by 00494d19
Novia mía, I've never heard the word "hoover" used as a verb. We have a verb "hover", which has nothing to do with a vacuum cleaner. - Goyo, MAY 27, 2010
Hoover is a brand-name of vacuum cleaners. - Goyo, MAY 27, 2010
Same here! We vacuum, or "run the vacuum." In the northern US, they "run the sweeper." - tennismom, MAY 27, 2010
Actually, I say, "Honey, will you....?" :) - tennismom, MAY 27, 2010
lol, jejejejejej, tennis great - 00494d19, MAY 27, 2010
I used to have a vacuum that "hovered". It exhausted air beneath it and supposedly hovered like an hovercraft boat Of course you ended up dragging it, but it dragged with less effort. - 0074b507, MAY 27, 2010
In UK English "to hoover" is used! - chicasabrosa, MAY 27, 2010
0
votes

Thanks for all the comments,technically Hoover is the brand name of a vacuum cleaner,but it is used all the time in Britain.I still say the hoovering needs doing even though my "hoover "is a Dyson.That has probably confused a few more people.Just one other thing Heidita says to" vacuum" is aspirar in my verb book that means to breathe.is this because when my wife tells me to vacuum i become short of breath?

updated MAY 27, 2010
posted by Gez
No doubt. :) - tennismom, MAY 27, 2010
0
votes

is this because when my wife tells me to vacuum I become short of breath?

updated MAY 27, 2010
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

I've never heard "to hoover" in the U.S.

We say:

Can you vaccuum (verb) the rug?

I have to vaccuum (verb) the carpet today.

I bought a new vaccuum (noun) today.

updated MAY 27, 2010
posted by --Mariana--
SpanishDict is the world's most popular Spanish-English dictionary, translation, and learning website.
© Curiosity Media Inc.