HomeQ&ADoes "que aproveche" have an idiomatic meaning?

Does "que aproveche" have an idiomatic meaning?

1
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A local Spanish restauranteur ends his radio advertisment with "que aproveche!" I spoke to him by phone and he said it was similar to saying "bon appetit".

50466 views
updated AGO 9, 2010
posted by RichKoz

8 Answers

5
votes

That's right. The most common way to say this is Buen provecho.

updated MAY 25, 2010
posted by 005faa61
Buen Provecho can also be a polite refusal to the question ¿Gusta Vd? "would you like some?" - Alandio, MAY 24, 2010
I've never heard it used that way. - 005faa61, MAY 24, 2010
Nor have I. - waltico, MAY 25, 2010
2
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Buen Provecho can also be a polite refusal to the question ¿Gusta Vd? "would you like some?" - Alandio

I understand why you're saying that, but I don't quite agree. What you are thinking of is a situation where someone is eating something - say a pizza or a piece of cake, and you come by to say hello, for example.

The person eating, being polite, offers you a piece: "¿Gustas un poco?"

You, having been brought up nicely by your momma, politely refuse by saying: "No, no,muchas gracias. ¡Buen provecho!"

The refusal is in the "No gracias" part. But good manners in Spanish, in most places I have been, require that you say "Buen provecho" whenever someone is eating something - whether you are participating in the meal or not.

This is important as a reference to the other questions in this thread, because Spanish speakers are often baffled when they share a meal with English speakers, who generally just sit down and start tucking in without further formality. (Maybe a prayer, but that's different). We have a very strong need to say something equivalent to the mandatory "Buen provecho", but as Margaret points out, "Have a nice meal" or "Enjoy" sounds rather lame.

The closest equivalent that I have found and use is indeed "bon appetit". Yeah, it's not English, but then again, it seems like there is no place in English for such pleasantries.

....I suppose that's probably because the English never had much of a cuisine to begin with, and didn't really think of food in terms of something to be enjoyed! tongue wink

updated AGO 9, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
Muy graciosa Gekko jajjajaaja - FELIZ77, AGO 9, 2010
Hah-hah-hah! Boy that bomb had been ticking there for a loooong time undiscovered! :-D - Gekkosan, AGO 9, 2010
"¿Gustas un poco?" --- "gustas"?! - samdie, AGO 9, 2010
@Samdie: right. That's one common way to ask: "would you like some?" - Gekkosan, AGO 9, 2010
1
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We of course being less cultured simply may say,"Don't wait for me, get stuck in and enjoy it before the flies get in for their chop" wink

updated SEP 10, 2010
posted by ray76
1
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Hmmm, good question margarit, maybe:

Have a nice meal.

or simply

Enjoysmile

updated AGO 9, 2010
posted by 00494d19
Sounds so lame, Spanish is better!!! - margaretbl, MAY 24, 2010
It would sound good if it were said sincerely, not half -heartedly as some Englsih people do paying lip service to such courtesies - FELIZ77, AGO 9, 2010
I mean, English - FELIZ77, AGO 9, 2010
0
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Spanish friends have asked me 'what do you say in English?' What would be good, 'enjoy your food?'

updated MAY 25, 2010
posted by margaretbl
As Gekkosan says, the correct answer to give your Spanish friends is that we generally don't say anything in English! - waltico, MAY 25, 2010
0
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I always tell my Spanish friends that we often use the French Bon Appétit!

updated MAY 24, 2010
posted by chris126
0
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I have been told to savour your meal when i lived in London, never heard it used here

updated MAY 24, 2010
posted by albert-fabrik-
0
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Translates to "may you enjoy (it)". Is this idiomatic in your definition?

updated MAY 24, 2010
posted by geofc
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