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desperta'o

0
votes

Came across some words reading today I didn't fully understand:

desperta'o

Is that short or abbreviated for despertado?

Similiar for these as well?

ama'o

solea'o

rocha'o

I figure they are, just wanted to double check..

1700 views
updated MAY 24, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by cheeseisyummy

3 Answers

1
vote

Despite what Heidita says, it is not restricted to Spain. The situation is similar to the use of an apostrophe in English when quoting dialog. In standard (but informal) English, one uses the apostrophe for certain contractions (e.g. can't/ hasn't/etc.) In quoting non-standard English dialog, the apostrophe can also be used (to suggest the actual pronunciation); the most common case being the reduction (in spoken English) of "-'ing" to "-in'" (to indicate that the 'g' is not really pronounced). Hence, "I'm goin' to ..."

By the same token, the final 'd' of past participles is often not pronounced (in casual conversation) in various regions (including but not restricted to Madrid). The apostrophe simply serves as a reminder that the author is aware that, in formal speech, the 'd' would be pronounced but, equally aware that in informal speech it might be elided.

updated MAY 24, 2010
posted by samdie
Nice. - margaretbl, MAY 24, 2010
1
vote

Hola amigo quesito:

Esto es "madrileño" puro(it is done all over Spain, but especially noticable here) , acortamos la d de la terminación ado, not an elegant thing to do, but we do so anywayraspberry

We also shorten ido to io. As far as I know this is not done in other Hispanic countries.

updated MAY 24, 2010
posted by 00494d19
0
votes

Ese pode ser una marca errado. También se encontró en un libro alguien pode colocar no libro por que elles hablan como escrito. No sé sen saber donde encontró.

updated MAY 24, 2010
posted by Xandron
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