HomeQ&AWhat Spanish Tenses Am I Thinking Of?

What Spanish Tenses Am I Thinking Of?

1
vote

I am really not sure of the name, and I'm curious. It is 2 different tenses, though I think they go together.

The first one is used when something happened, but could still be happening. like if someone was sick, they could still be sick... but you don't know.

and the other tense is when something happened, but you know has stopped for a fact. like death, or something.

I'm not sure if the second is past tense, I think it is.. but for some reason I'm thinking it's something else too. It's hard to explain.

Any information that you know could help my curiosity! Thanks smile

2108 views
updated MAY 24, 2010
edited by AvA126
posted by AvA126

6 Answers

1
vote

Hi, Entonces, I see from your profile that you are learning both English and Spanish.

I don't know if I can help you, but I will try.

In English: the present perfect tense is used to indicate something that happened in the past but still has impact on the future. Example: "I have seen that movie". In effect, I saw that movie, but for whatever reason it is still impacting me. Another example: " I have already eaten". In other words, I ate and it is still impacting me because I am not hungry now. "She has been sick". In other words, she was sick, and the problems associated with her sickness are still causing problems for her.

In Spanish that tense is called thepresente perfecto. To take the most recent English example and put it into Spanish: "(Ella) ha estado enferma" - tal vez siga enferma, o ya estará algo mejor pero le quedarán algunos problemas de salud.

Your second tense seems to be the simple past tense also known as the pretéritoin Spanish. This tense is used when something happened and it is definitely over with. There is no implied impact that continues to the present.
Examples: "she went yesterday - se fue ayer", "I got sick - me enfermé", "my cacary died - se me murió el canario".

I apologize if I did not understand your question, but maybe this is what you were wondering.

updated MAY 23, 2010
posted by mountaingirl123
1
vote

Imperfect Indicative: How long has he been sick.

Agree with Preterite

updated MAY 23, 2010
edited by 00a52084
posted by 00a52084
You are correct Don I have adjusted/edited the first part of my answer after consulting my 501 Spanish verbs by Professor Christopher Kendris - FELIZ77, MAY 23, 2010
I changed Present Indicative to Imperfect Indicative because completion is not indicated. - 00a52084, MAY 23, 2010
Using the same 501 I did all of the tenses for “Hablar” in excel trying to understand the English tense relation. - 00a52084, MAY 23, 2010
The more I look at it the more unsure I become. - 00a52084, MAY 23, 2010
0
votes
updated MAY 24, 2010
posted by 00494d19
0
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Present Indicative: Something that started in the past and continues to the present. Was sick and is still sick

Imperfect Indicative: Something that was continuous in the past and its completion is not indicated. Was sick and still sick is unknown, at the same time or prior to a another action.

but you don't know

This is what I am unsure of.

Preterit: Something that started and was completed in the past.

updated MAY 23, 2010
posted by 00a52084
0
votes

The first situation you are thinking of is the present indicative tense of a verb

It is where an action or state of being that occurred in the past and continues up to the present. In Spanish this is an idiomatic use of the present tense of a verb with hace which is also in the present. For example:

Hace tres horas que miro la televisión = I have been watching television for three hours.

The second situation is illustrated by the Preterite tense (Pretérito) or simple past which indicates that an action has happened once and is complete.

Compró un periódico = I bought a newspaper

updated MAY 23, 2010
edited by FELIZ77
posted by FELIZ77
0
votes

First one: are you think of the tense which is like the English construction of "I HAVE been sick"? "He estado enfermero/a"

Second one: I think you are thinking of the preterite. "Algo pasó."

updated MAY 23, 2010
posted by aceydoubleyou
what is the name of the first one? - AvA126, MAY 23, 2010
Like aceydoubleyo said, He estado enfermero/a. He (verb Haber) estado (participle of Estar). Make sense? - Jack-OBrien, MAY 23, 2010
The official name of that tense is the "Presente Perfecto" but I'm not sure if it's what you're thinking of. - Perry-Bleiberg, MAY 23, 2010
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