HomeQ&AYou are up =Estás levantado?

You are up =Estás levantado?

1
vote

At class yesterday I was discussing with my fellow classmates the subject of "now we need to speak the language" since the class is almost over. The suggestion was to use the language every chance you get no matter where you are or what you are doing. So this morning I thought I would greet my husband in spanish when he got up which brought to mind what I usually say "You're up.". Such a simple statement but I couldn't even think of which tense or which verb to use for "you are" I came up with "has, eres, and estás. I settled on "estás" but I am still not sure if it is correct. Then "up" which brought to mind the reflexive verb levantarse. Frustrated, I thought now how in the world can you use this verb for "up" in a form to be understood. I came up with levantado. When my husband got up, I belted out "Estás levantado." and of course he gave me a strange look and said "get up". From his answer, I assumed I must have said it all wrong. He is at the same level of learning spanish as I am with a little more understanding of what is spoken. After more discussion, we were still at a loss as to whether I made the correct statement or not.

Gee, if I have to go through this every time I open my mouth to speak spanish, it may take me 10 more years to get up to speed. Does everyone who is learning to converse go through this?

3882 views
updated MAY 17, 2010
edited by 00494d19
posted by foxluv

7 Answers

1
vote

Hi fox, you will be glad to hear, that it is quite obvious that your husband's understanding is not so wonderful as you thoughtwink

YOu were actually right, or almost spot on:

"Estás levantado."

This means you are up as in you already got up. So if he did not get it, so much the worse for himraspberry

I do not agree with viajero:

Estas despierto

This means, hi, you are awake. Not the same thing of course. If you are awake, you can still be in bed, and stay there for the whole day if you wish. YOu would still not be "levantado".

I have changed the title and category, interesting question for further searches.

Nothing to be frustrated about anyway, as you were spot on! grin

updated MAY 16, 2010
posted by 00494d19
5
votes

You were very, very close!

Mi rey ("My king" to keep him from yelling at you), veo que te has levantado.

updated MAY 16, 2010
posted by 005faa61
Julian, this really seems to be the correct usage, except when you speak to your loved ones, why so formal and long? "Estas despierto" seems so informal and to the point and sounds really nice. - foxluv, MAY 16, 2010
Julian, ¡Qué sentido de humor! lol - Delores--Lindsey, MAY 16, 2010
In Spanish, it is not formal. (The "King" part, which is joking here, is many times used to mean "My Dearest"). And don't forget: comparing languages can lead one astray. "Despierto" is "awake," not "up, out of bed." - 005faa61, MAY 16, 2010
Dolores, lo has entendido como se debe de ser. ¡Bien hecho! - 005faa61, MAY 16, 2010
3
votes

You are to hung-up with the grammar and verb conjugations. Let it go when you are speaking in Spanish -- there is no time to think about correct grammar and verb conjugations.

Listen and speak in the rhythm, sounds and feeling of the language. Speak to yourself outloud and with Spanish speaking people as much as possible (do not even worry about how poorly you may speak) and you will get better and better with the rhythm and sounds.

I am not sure I should mention this here: First of all my Spanish grammar is poor but improving with frequent Spanish conversations. So ... Ok here goes. I have had Spanish conversations with native Spanish speakers along with 2 non-native speakers (that makes 3 non-native speakers with me included) at the gym. The other 2 non-native speakers know their grammar much better than I do -- but I understand the native speakers so much better and speak circles in Spanish around the other 2 non-native speakers.

I am not down-playing grammar -- but emphasizing the rhythm, feeling and sounds of Spanish. After all my personal goal has been to have conversations in Spanish, I may never speak error free perfect Spanish.

Ok everyone give me works about misleading the poster.

updated MAY 16, 2010
posted by Daniel
What poster? - Delores--Lindsey, MAY 16, 2010
Great perspective Daniel. I think that you are spot on that far too many people get hung up or overemphasize being "perfect" grammatically that their ability to implement this knowledge often lags lightyears behind their ability to cite various nuances - Izanoni1, MAY 16, 2010
of grammar. This is the same reason why there are so many who say things like, I can read Spanish very well or I am very advanced in my reading ability, but I can't understand it when it's spoken or I get tongue tied when trying to speak it. That's not - Izanoni1, MAY 16, 2010
to say that I find grammar unimportant. It's just that I think that far too many people prioritize learning the rules of grammar at the expense of actually going out and practicing the language. End rant - Izanoni1, MAY 16, 2010
2
votes

"you are up".!!!!

Estas despierto

Bien, acuerdate que muchas veces no se puede traducir el ingles a español palabra por palabra. Tu dicho,” you are up” can be translated as “estas despierto” which actually means “you are awake”.

Translation: Rebember that many times a translation can't be done word by word. Your saying, " you are up" can be traslated as "estas despierto" .

updated MAY 16, 2010
edited by viajero
posted by viajero
Yes! I was also thinking of that word also as a choice and I really like the sound of what you wrote. Qué chévere! - foxluv, MAY 16, 2010
2
votes

¡¡¡Ya te levantaste!!! this is the correct translation, it means "you have risen" in Spanish it does not sound so regal. Mr. JulianChives' answer made me think- This is the good thing about this forum, it makes me thing even though, I am not a thinking person,rather I am the impulsive type. Remember in most cases translation can't not be done word by word.

updated MAY 16, 2010
edited by viajero
posted by viajero
1
vote

I believe "subir" - to rise - might work for you, you'll have to figure out the right tense and conjugation, I haven't got a clue !

To answer your main question, I doubt myself with every statement and answer. You just have to hope that you're understood. The main objective has to be communication. I believe that if you're close, people will understand. If you use the wrong tense, or conjugation, or gender, or mis-pronounce, then so be it, just get the main point over. I'm on holiday soon, and I expect to make a lot of mistakes, and hopefully learn from them. Good Luck.

updated MAY 16, 2010
posted by fontanero
0
votes

Let it go when you are speaking in Spanish -- there is no time to think about correct grammar and verb conjugations.

There is a nubbin of good advice in this but, perhaps, you did not read all of the original post before replying. She did not allow the fear of making a mistake (nor the choice of verbs nor any other grammatical consideration) to leave he tongue-tied/speechless. She gave it her best shot (that her husband disagreed is, largely, irrelevant). She has now posed a question after the fact about the wisdom of her choice (or other alternatives).

If one never thinks about word choice/grammatical issues, one is unlikely to ever get beyond speaking "broken Spanish" (because one is deprived of the opportunity to learn from one's mistakes or, more generally, from one's experience). There is "time to think about correct grammar and verb conjugations" but that time is not while one is in the middle of a conversation.

updated MAY 17, 2010
posted by samdie
I agree, by the time you accurately select every part of a sentence, your conversation would be so dis-jointed it woul be pointless. - fontanero, MAY 17, 2010
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