HomeQ&Aa little help with a magazine article thanks

a little help with a magazine article thanks

0
votes

un entorno que se levanta, que coloniza sin imponerse, y se hace casa en este proyecto lleno de curvas y pendientes cuyo interior se ordena a partir de una escalera central.

my translation.

an environment that raises, that colonises without imposing y makes a home en this project full of curves y whose interior slopes arrange a divide of the central staircase.

How close am I here? I don't really understand why 'casa' doesn't have an article, or exactly 'ordenarse a partir.

1254 views
updated MAY 13, 2010
posted by alexengijon

2 Answers

3
votes

¡Hola!, Alexengijon:

'Casa' without an article may be a conjugation of the verb 'casar' whose predominant meaning we may think of a 'to marry.' However, 'casar' does have other meanings. You may want to see our dictionary definition found here ----> casar.

'Casa' is the 3rd person singular of the present tense of 'casar.' Maybe in the example you have enquired about it means:

un entorno que se levanta, que coloniza sin imponerse, y se hace casa en este proyecto lleno de curvas y pendientes cuyo interior se ordena a partir de una escalera central. an environment that is raised, that colonises without imposing, and makes things fit together (as in 'to suit or proportion the plan') in this project full of curves whose interior slopes are orderd from the central staircase.

The problem for me is to understand the use of 'coloniza' in the statement. Is this a description of a 'colonial' style of architecture? Could 'coloniza' be interpreted to mean "colonializes'?

Muchos saludos/Best regards,

Moe

updated MAY 13, 2010
edited by Moe
posted by Moe
Thanks for taking the time to give such a great answer. Colonial architecture, I think not, it's an article on 'casa sostenbiles'. - alexengijon, MAY 13, 2010
'casas' - alexengijon, MAY 13, 2010
maybe 'se hace casa' means 'comes together'. I did the lesson 3.15 earlier and 'hacerse' is 'to become' or 'to get'. So maybe it is 'and that comes together in this project...' I will ask my teacher what she thinks tomorrow. :) - alexengijon, MAY 13, 2010
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How close am I here? I don't really understand why 'casa' doesn't have an article, or exactly 'ordenarse a partir.

Neither do I. Makes no sense.

a partir de...very good translation by Moe.

updated MAY 13, 2010
posted by 00494d19
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