HomeQ&A¡Fuera de mi casa ahora!

¡Fuera de mi casa ahora!

2
votes

From the show ¿Dónde está Elisa? this command was shouted ¡Fuera de mi casa ahora!

Would this be a 'normal' way of ordering someone out of your house? I didn't know fuera could be used as a command. Just wondering.

Thanks!

3816 views
updated MAY 12, 2010
posted by Jack-OBrien
Has a woman ever yelled at you "Fuera de mi cocina, ahora! :) Cooking is a solitary art...not a gruop endeavor! - mountaingirl123, MAY 11, 2010
I'm tickled to learn phrases like this, it does give me new possibilities :~) - Jack-OBrien, MAY 12, 2010

6 Answers

2
votes

Normal? It's rather abrupt. "Out of my house! Now!" Fuera isn't a command; it means out.

updated MAY 11, 2010
posted by tennismom
It was used as a command, one lady had just slapped the other one in the face. I think it was taken as a command :~) - Jack-OBrien, MAY 11, 2010
That's right. I thought you meant that you thought "fuera" was a verb here. Sorry! - tennismom, MAY 11, 2010
Well, that *was* my point of confusion. It feels like a verb in this context, but really it isn't? Thanks! - Jack-OBrien, MAY 11, 2010
1
vote

It's exactly the same as English "Out of my house, now!". No verb there, either. Doesn't really seem necessary. And, yes, it is a common way of kicking people out of your house.

updated MAY 11, 2010
posted by KevinB
I've been beat up a bit lately with things that were not "exactly the same as English", hehe. It just seemed kind of odd to me to not have a verb. Thanks! - Jack-OBrien, MAY 11, 2010
1
vote

Hi, Jack..."Fuera" can be used for this, just as in English.

updated MAY 11, 2010
posted by mountaingirl123
Thanks. I guess this was the first time I'd heard a 'command' like this. - Jack-OBrien, MAY 11, 2010
0
votes

This is another way of saying, "¡Sácate de mi casa ahora mismo!"

updated MAY 11, 2010
posted by 005faa61
Really, thanks I did not know that one. I would have said something like 'Sal de mi casa..' or maybe 'vete de mi..' if angry - margaretbl, MAY 11, 2010
0
votes

"Attention" is a well-known command in English which doesn't use a verb. So who needs the formality of saying "Get out of my house"?

updated MAY 11, 2010
posted by geofc
Well, the thing is, Spanish has this wonderful 'imperative' mode or 'command' mode, and English doesn't. Trying to put 2 + 2 together. - Jack-OBrien, MAY 11, 2010
0
votes

out fron my home righ now

updated MAY 11, 2010
posted by EL_NENE
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