HomeQ&AMás vale que se quede en eso, en sospecha

Más vale que se quede en eso, en sospecha

0
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Más vale que se quede en eso, en sospecha Could this be a frase hecha? It's in quotation marks as if it's a saying. Or is the root Más vale que se quede en eso..., ?

Thanks again for the help. I'm thinking "better stay suspicious" but that doesn't seem quite right. Or.. "Better that you are under suspicion"...?

2940 views
updated MAY 13, 2010
edited by lagartijaverde
posted by lagartijaverde

8 Answers

2
votes

Algo te traes tú entre manos - dijo mi padre cuando estábamos a punto de salir. El mero hecho de que mi padre expresara en voz alta una sospecha la convertía inmediatamente en advertencia: «Más vale que se quede en eso, en sospecha».

Which shows, bird, once again, context is essential. Maybe you can add a couple of sentences each time you post a part of this interesting bookgrin

Now, there is no doubt in my mind, he is saying:

I warn you! This had better just keep being a suspicion.

Look, the "advertencia" is the clue.wink I am sure you can improve that sentence, can't think of anything better than keep...

updated MAY 10, 2010
posted by 00494d19
Excellent! By Jove you have it! :-) - lagartijaverde, MAY 10, 2010
So in the end, I figure we all agree. Turned out that the "guilty" party was the narrator, and so it was definitely not in his best interest that the father could prove his suspicions. There are two ways out of the dilemma: - Gekkosan, MAY 10, 2010
1. The son had better behave and keep to the straight and narrow or 2. He should be very careful to cover his tracks and not be found guilty by his father. As long as the father could not get past the stage of suspicion, all's well. - Gekkosan, MAY 10, 2010
3
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Well, just off the bat, I haven't given it much thought, but @ first glance, I would say what it's getting at is close to what you're saying, but more accurately put would be "better stay alert" or maybe, "Better to stay alert with that." A similar saying in English is, "Better keep an eye on that". I'm just throwing some ideas out there. Anyone feel free to correct me. smile

updated MAY 13, 2010
edited by DJ_Huero
posted by DJ_Huero
Sorry, I'm afraid that you are way off. Nice try, but not right. :-) - Gekkosan, MAY 9, 2010
DJ!!! How have you been!! Nice to see you around:) - 00494d19, MAY 9, 2010
jaja, I been good. life has seem to of hit a catalyst point and moving quite fast now. still trying to keep my spanish up, but i'm starting to slack of some my slang, as seen here. =) - DJ_Huero, MAY 13, 2010
2
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To me, the phrase refers to some situation where possibly someone's reputation is at stake. What if it turns out to be true? Are the consequences of whatever suspicion turning out to be true worth it?

Maybe it is better that things carry on the way they are, that the suspicion remains uncleared, than dealing with the consequences of it finding the party guilty.

updated MAY 10, 2010
posted by Gekkosan
1
vote

I agree with Gekkosan - better to leave it at that, just as a suspicion, rather than trying to verify it.

Is there a context, such as it is rumored that Person X has done something or said something?

Sometimes it's better "not to stir the pot" (is that in the Phrasebook?) or "to add fuel to the fire".

updated MAY 10, 2010
posted by mountaingirl123
0
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Here's a link about Pilar Bellver. I think someone Heidita? asked who she was.

link text

I used: “This had better just keep on being a suspicion” by the way.

updated MAY 10, 2010
edited by lagartijaverde
posted by lagartijaverde
0
votes

Sorry... double post

updated MAY 10, 2010
edited by lagartijaverde
posted by lagartijaverde
0
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Here's more context

Algo te traes tú entre manos - dijo mi padre cuando estábamos a punto de salir. El mero hecho de que mi padre expresara en voz alta una sospecha la convertía inmediatamente en advertencia: «Más vale que se quede en eso, en sospecha».

I tentatively have:

“You've got something up your sleeve”, my father said when we were about to leave. The mere fact that my father expressed his suspicion aloud immediately became a word of warning:...

updated MAY 10, 2010
posted by lagartijaverde
0
votes

I would say what it's getting at is close to what you're saying, but more accurately put would be "better stay alert" or maybe, "Better to stay alert with that." A similar saying in English is, "Better keep an eye on that".

Great to see you around, DJ! I missed ya! jeje

Yes, that is just it!

Keep and eye on that. That is exactly it.

Maybe it is better that things carry on the way they are, that the suspicion remains uncleared,

Not really gekko.

Más vale que vengas a las ocho. You MUST come at eight.

Más vale que hagas los deberes que si no....You must do your homework, otherwise...

Which is exactly like:

Mejor será que....

Sounds innocent, but if somebody says that, you had better to what he says, there will be consequences otherwise. It does not imply: mabye you should ...maybe it would be better if...

updated MAY 9, 2010
posted by 00494d19
I was going to say that we'd just have to agree to disagree on this one - then I figured a context where it could mean what you and DJ say it means. Now I think maybe the contex is necessary to be sure. Your argument can be used to support what I say too: - Gekkosan, MAY 9, 2010
..."mejor será que se quede como está"... porque si no..:" I feel more natural with my interpretation, though. - Gekkosan, MAY 9, 2010
0
votes

It's better that it remains like that , with suspicion. To me it looks like they're saying that its better that we still keep a tab on it since its suspicious.

updated MAY 9, 2010
posted by SELWICH425
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